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Hydrobiologia

, 567:227 | Cite as

A landscape-scale model of yellow-billed loon (Gavia adamsii) habitat preferences in northern alaska

  • Susan L. Earnst
  • Robert Platte
  • Laura Bond
Article

Abstract

We modeled yellow-billed loon (Gavia adamsii) habitat preferences in a 23,500 km2 area of northern Alaska using intensive aerial surveys and landscape-scale habitat descriptors. Of the 757 lakes censused, yellow-billed loons occupied 15% and Pacific loons (G. pacifica) 42%. Lake area, depth, proportion of shoreline in aquatic vegetation, shoreline complexity, hydrological connectivity (stream present within 100 m or absent), and an area–connectivity interaction were positive, significant predictors of yellow-billed loon presence in a multivariate logistic regression model, but distance to nearest river or Beaufort Sea coast were not. Predicted yellow-billed loon presence was 13 and 4.7 times more likely on deep and medium lakes, respectively, than on shallow lakes that freeze to the bottom. On small lakes (<60 ha), predicted yellow-billed loon presence was 4.8–1.7 times more likely on lakes with hydrological connectivity than without, but connectivity was not important at most lake sizes (65–750 ha). Yellow-billed loon broods depend on fish available in the brood-rearing lake, and we suggest that a dependable supply of fish is more likely in larger lakes, those deep enough to have open water under winter ice, and those near streams. Highly convoluted shorelines and those with aquatic vegetation provide loon nesting and brood-rearing sites, as well as fish habitat. Pacific loon absence was a significant, positive predictor when added to the habitat model, indicating that yellow-billed loons were four times more likely on lakes without Pacific loons.

Keywords

Gavia adamsii GIS habitat relationship model yellow-billed loons 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.U.S. Geological SurveyForest & Rangeland Ecosystem Science CenterBoiseUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Fish & Wildlife ServiceMigratory Bird ManagementAnchorageUSA
  3. 3.Department of Institutional AssessmentBoise State UniversityBoiseUSA

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