Hydrobiologia

, 555:185 | Cite as

Biogeographic Patterns of Intertidal Macroinvertebrates and their Association with Macroalgae Distribution along the Portuguese Coast

  • Sílvia G. Pereira
  • Fernando P. Lima
  • Nuno C. Queiroz
  • Pedro A. Ribeiro
  • António M. Santos

Abstract

Geographical patterns in the distribution of epifaunal crustaceans (Amphipoda, Isopoda and Tanaidacea) occurring with dominant macroalgal species were investigated along the Portuguese rocky coast. Three regions, each encompassing six shores, were studied. Algal species were selected according to their geographical distribution: Mastocarpusstellatus and Chondruscrispus (north); Bifurcariabifurcata (north-centre); Plocamiumcartilagineum and Cystoseiratamariscifolia (centre-south); Corallina spp. and Codiumtomentosum (entire coast). Multivariate techniques were used to test for differences in crustacean assemblage composition between sub-regions and host algal species. A clear gradient of species substitution was observed from north to south. Differences in abundance and diversity of epifaunal crustaceans were observed between southern locations and the remaining sites. Four species were recorded for the first time in the Portuguese coast. Among the 57 taxa identified, southern distribution limits were observed for three species and northern distribution limits were observed for four species. Interestingly, the observed geographical patterns in epifaunal abundance and diversity were not related with geographical changes in the indentity of the dominant algal species.

Key words

Amphipoda biogeography Isopoda macroalgae Portugal Tanaidacea 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sílvia G. Pereira
    • 1
  • Fernando P. Lima
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nuno C. Queiroz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pedro A. Ribeiro
    • 2
  • António M. Santos
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departmento de Zoologia-AntropologiaFaculdade de Ciências da Universidade do PortoPortoPortugal
  2. 2.CIBIOCentro de Investigaçem Biodiversidade e Recursos GenéticosVairãoPortugal

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