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Husserl Studies

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 13–25 | Cite as

Objects and Levels: Reflections on the Relation Between Time-Consciousness and Self-Consciousness

  • Dan ZahaviEmail author
Article

Abstract

The text surveys the development of the debate between Zahavi and Brough/Sokolowski regarding Husserl’s account of inner time-consciousness. The main arguments on both sides are reconsidered, and a compromise is proposed.

Keywords

Conscious State Temporal Object Absolute Flow Internal Object Diachronic Unity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Subjectivity Research, Department of Media, Cognition and CommunicationUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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