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Husserl Studies

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 229–246 | Cite as

Experience and Evidence

  • Nam-In LeeEmail author
Article

Abstract

It is the aim of this paper to assess Levinas’s criticism of Husserl’s concept of evidence. In Sect. 1, I will summarize Levinas’s criticism of Husserl’s concept of evidence. In Sect. 2, I will delineate Husserl’s concept of experience and in Sect. 3, I will try to define the concept of evidence in Husserl. In Sect. 4–6, I will assess Levinas’s criticism of Husserl’s concepts of evidence and show that Levinas’s criticism of Husserl’s concept of evidence is out of the mark, since it is based on a total misunderstanding of Husserl’s concepts of evidence.

Keywords

Adequate Evidence Hermeneutic Phenomenology Cartesian Meditation Transcendental Subjectivity Transcendental Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy, College of HumanitiesSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea

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