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Does heart failure increase the risk of incident cancer? A meta-analysis and systematic review

  • Hanlai Zhang
  • Yonghong Gao
  • Liqin Wang
  • Li Tian
  • Na An
  • Xinyu Yang
  • Xinye Li
  • Chao Tian
  • Mengchen Yuan
  • Xingjiang Xiong
  • Nian Liu
  • Hongcai ShangEmail author
  • Yanwei XingEmail author
Article
  • 52 Downloads

Abstract

Recently, several studies have demonstrated that heart failure (HF) may increase the risk of incident cancer. However, this association has not been statistically and systematically verified by any comprehensive pooled analyses. We performed a meta-analysis on cancer morbidity and co-mortality of adults with HF in a large sample size to explore the relationship between HF and the risk of developing cancer. From inception to April 2019, we searched PubMed and EMBASE for published relevant articles on patients with HF diagnosed with cancer afterwards, with reported outcomes of morbidity and mortality. Two investigators independently reviewed these included studies. Study data were independently extracted using predefined data extraction forms. Random and fixed-effects models were fit for the study duration. This analysis consisted of 4 cohort studies comprising 5,004,251 participants. The relative risk (RR) for incident cancer was 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13–1.33) indicating that patients with HF may have a higher risk of developing cancer. The pooled RR of co-mortality was 2.03 (95% CI, 1.13–3.65), indicating that HF associated with cancer increases the risk of mortality. In this meta-analysis and systematic review, our results demonstrated that heart failure may increase the risk of incident cancer and that HF associated with cancer increases the risk of mortality.

Keywords

Heart failure Cancer morbidity Mortality Meta-analysis Systematic review 

Notes

Author contributions

YWX and HCS developed the concept of the study. HLZ wrote the manuscript. YHG and NL conducted the search strategy. LQW, LT, and NA independently screened the titles and abstracts of all retrieved records. LT collated all the references. MCY and CT conducted data extraction. XYY, XJX, and XYL performed meta-analysis. NL checked the language and grammatical errors for the full text. All authors approved the final version of the manuscript.

Funding information

The work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2017YFC1700400 and 2018YFC1704901) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81725024 and 8143009)

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hanlai Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yonghong Gao
    • 2
  • Liqin Wang
    • 2
  • Li Tian
    • 1
  • Na An
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinyu Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinye Li
    • 1
    • 3
  • Chao Tian
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mengchen Yuan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xingjiang Xiong
    • 1
  • Nian Liu
    • 4
  • Hongcai Shang
    • 2
    Email author
  • Yanwei Xing
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Guang’an men HospitalChina Academy of Chinese Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and BeijingDongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese MedicineBeijingChina
  3. 3.Beijing University of Chinese MedicineBeijingChina
  4. 4.Department of Cardiology, Beijing Anzhen HospitalCapital Medical UniversityBeijingChina

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