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Irish technological universities and the binary divide: a qualitative study

  • Ludovic HighmanEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article aims to examine and analyse the perceptions of senior policy-makers, lobby groups representatives and both higher education academics and professional managers on the establishing of technological universities in Ireland, and its implications for the fabric of the Irish higher education system, in terms of the structure of the Irish higher education system, academic drift and the diversity of Irish higher education institutions.

Keywords

Higher education Technological universities Binary system Diversity Differentiation Academic drift Mission drift 

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University College LondonLondonUK

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