HEC Forum

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 19–29

A Pilot Qualitative Study of “Conflicts of Interests and/or Conflicting Interests” Among Canadian Bioethicists. Part 2: Defining and Managing Conflicts

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Abstract

This paper examines one aspect of professional practice for bioethicists: managing conflicts of interest. Drawing from our qualitative study and descriptive analysis of the experiences of conflicts of interest and/or conflicting interests (COI) of 13 Canadian clinical bioethicists (Frolic and Chidwick 2010), this paper examines how bioethicists define their roles, the nature of COIs in their roles, how their COIs relate to conventional definitions of conflicts of interest, and how COIs can be most effectively managed.

Keywords

Bioethics Clinical ethics Clinical ethics consultation Conflicts of interest 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hamilton Health SciencesMcMaster University Medical CenterHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.William Osler Health Centre, Etobicoke General HospitalEtobicokeCanada

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