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Group Decision and Negotiation

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 301–321 | Cite as

Collaboration ‘Engineerability’

  • Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten
  • Gert-Jan de Vreede
  • Robert O. Briggs
  • Henk G. Sol
Article

Abstract

Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assumption in this approach is that we can predictably design collaboration processes. In this paper we explore this assumption to understand whether collaboration can, in fact, be designed, and elaborate on the role of thinkLets in the engineering of collaborative work practices. ThinkLets are design patterns for collaborative interactions.

Keywords

Collaboration Collaboration engineering ThinkLets Collaboration support Collaboration process design Patterns Facilitation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gwendolyn L. Kolfschoten
    • 1
  • Gert-Jan de Vreede
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert O. Briggs
    • 3
  • Henk G. Sol
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Department of Systems EngineeringDelft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Center for Collaboration ScienceUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaOmahaUSA
  3. 3.College of Business Administration, Center for Collaboration ScienceUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaOmahaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Business EngineeringUniversity of Groningen, Faculty of Management and OrganizationsGroningenThe Netherlands

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