Journal of Grid Computing

, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp 209–222 | Cite as

GeneGrid: Architecture, Implementation and Application

  • P. V. Jithesh
  • P. Donachy
  • T. Harmer
  • N. Kelly
  • R. Perrott
  • S. Wasnik
  • J. Johnston
  • M. McCurley
  • M. Townsley
  • S. McKee
Article

Abstract

The emergence of Grid computing technology has opened up an unprecedented opportunity for biologists to share and access data, resources and tools in an integrated environment leading to a greater chance of knowledge discovery. GeneGrid is a Grid computing framework that seamlessly integrates a myriad of heterogeneous resources spanning multiple administrative domains and locations. It provides scientists an integrated environment for the streamlined access of a number of bioinformatics programs and databases through a simple and intuitive interface. It acts as a virtual bioinformatics laboratory by allowing scientists to create, execute and manage workflows that represent bioinformatics experiments. A number of cooperating Grid services interact in an orchestrated manner to provide this functionality. This paper gives insight into the details of the architecture, components and implementation of GeneGrid.

Key words

Bioinformatics GeneGrid Globus Grid computing Virtual Bioinformatics Laboratory 

Abbreviations

OGSA

open Grid services architecture

SOA

service oriented architecture

OGSI

open Grid services infrastructure

SOAP

simple object access protocol

GAMSF

GeneGrid application manager service factory

GAMS

GeneGrid application manager service

OGSA-DAI

open Grid services architecture-database access and integration

GDMSF

GeneGrid data manager service factory

GDMS

GeneGrid data manager service

GWDD

GeneGrid workflow definition database

GSTRIP

GeneGrid status tracking, results & input parameters database

GWMSF

GeneGrid workflow manager service factory

GWMS

GeneGrid workflow manager service

GNM

GeneGrid node monitor

GARR

GeneGrid application and resources registry

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. V. Jithesh
    • 1
  • P. Donachy
    • 1
  • T. Harmer
    • 1
  • N. Kelly
    • 1
  • R. Perrott
    • 1
  • S. Wasnik
    • 1
  • J. Johnston
    • 2
  • M. McCurley
    • 2
  • M. Townsley
    • 2
  • S. McKee
    • 3
  1. 1.Belfast e-Science Centre, Computer ScienceThe Queen’s University of BelfastBelfastUK
  2. 2.Fusion Antibodies Ltd.BelfastUK
  3. 3.Amtec Medical Ltd.AntrimUK

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