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Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution

, Volume 63, Issue 2, pp 235–242 | Cite as

Phylogenetic relationship of 40 species of genus Aloe L. and the origin of an allodiploid species revealed by nucleotide sequence variation in chloroplast intergenic space and cytogenetic in situ hybridization

  • Yun Sun Lee
  • Hye Mi Park
  • Nam-Hoon Kim
  • Nomar E. Waminal
  • Yeon Jeong Kim
  • Ki-Byung Lim
  • Jin Hong Baek
  • Hyun Hee Kim
  • Tae-Jin Yang
Research Article

Abstract

Aloe species, which have been used as medicinal plants, belong to the Asphodelaceae family consisting of 530 species. In this study, genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 40 Aloe species including a putative interspecies hybrid were analyzed using PCR band profiles from eight chloroplast intergenic space markers and nucleotide sequence diversity in the psbK–psbI intergenic region. A phylogenetic tree based on psbK–psbI sequences supported the revised classification of the genus Aloe as polyphyletic with several species be re-allocated into three genera Kumara, Aloidendron, and Aloiampelos. Further, the origin of the putative interspecies Aloe hybrid was characterized through molecular cytogenetics. Fluorescence and genomic in situ hybridization illustrated that the hybrid has a bimodal karyotype with a chromosome complement of 2n = 14, of which complementary halves were derived from two parental species, A. vera and A. arborescens. These findings revealed that the hybrid species was allodiploid. The phylogenetic analysis showed that A. arborescens was the maternal genome donor of the hybrid, as both have identical chloroplast genome sequences. We thus conclude that the allodiploid hybrid should be called A. arborescens × A.vera.

Keywords

Aloe Allodiploid interspecific hybrid psbK–psbGenetic diversity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the Next-Generation BioGreen 21 Program (No. PJ011030-01) of the Rural Development Administration and Kim Jeong Moon Aloe Co. Republic of Korea.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yun Sun Lee
    • 1
  • Hye Mi Park
    • 1
  • Nam-Hoon Kim
    • 1
  • Nomar E. Waminal
    • 1
  • Yeon Jeong Kim
    • 1
  • Ki-Byung Lim
    • 2
  • Jin Hong Baek
    • 3
  • Hyun Hee Kim
    • 4
  • Tae-Jin Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life SciencesSeoul National UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of Horticultural ScienceKyungpook National UniversityDaeguKorea
  3. 3.Kim Jeong Moon Aloe Co. LTDSeoulKorea
  4. 4.Department of Life Science, Plant Biotechnology InstituteSahmyook UniversitySeoulKorea

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