Advertisement

Glass and Ceramics

, Volume 76, Issue 9–10, pp 381–386 | Cite as

Foam-Ceramic-Glass Synthesis Using a Mechanized Extrusive Method of Batch Preparation

  • K. S. IvanovEmail author
Article

The synthesis of inorganic heat-insulating material — foam-glass-ceramic — using activating methods of batch preparation in the form of batch extrusion and autoclaving is examined. Intensification of the interaction of NaOH with the amorphous phases of opal-cristobalite rock occurs, as a result of which the average density of the material decreases significantly. An economic benefit is achieved on account of a proportional reduction of the content of costly sodium hydroxide in the material. The introduction of container-glass cullet into the batch gives an even greater reduction of the average density of the samples as well as NaOH consumption reduction and, therefore, the cost of production of the foam-glass-ceramic.

Key words

foam-glass-ceramic diatomite sodium silicate cullet 

Notes

This work was performed according to the R&D plan of the Tyumen Technological Center of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Priority direction IX.135. Program IX.135.2 Project: IX.135.2.4. This research was partially conducted at Autonomous Nonprofit Institute ‘Gubernskaya Akademiya’ (Tyumen, Russia).

References

  1. 1.
    L. K. Kazantsev, D. V. Zheleznov, Yu. V. Seretkin, and S. V. Rashchenko, “Formation of a pore-forming gas source by wetting natural aluminum-silicate with NaOH solution,” Steklo Keram., No. 10, 37 – 42 (2013); L. K. Kazantsev, D. V. Zheleznov, Yu. V. Seretkin, and S. V. Rashchenko, “Formation of a poreforming gas source by wetting natural aluminum-silicate with NaOH solution,” Glass Ceram., 69(9 – 10), 352 – 357 (2013).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. A. Senik, A. V. Meshkov, A. L. Vinitskii, et al., “Obtaining high-efficiency heat-insulating material based on diatomite by low-temperature foaming,” Tekh. Tekhnol. Silikatov, 19(4), 6 – 12 (2012).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    L. K. Kazantseva and S. V. Rashchenko, “Chemical processes during energy-saving preparation of lightweight ceramics,” J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 97(6), 1743 – 1749 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    K. S. Ivanov, S. S. Radaev, and O. I. Selezneva, “Diatomites in granular foam-glass technology,” Steklo Keram., No. 5, 15 – 19 (2014); K. S. Ivanov, S. S. Radaev, and O. I. Selezneva, “Diatomites in granular foam-glass technology,” Glass Ceram., 71(5 – 6), 157 – 161 (2014).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    N. I. Malyavskii, “Alkali-silicate insulation. Properties and chemical fundamentals of production,” Ross. khim. Zh., XLVIV(4), 39 – 45 (2003).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    V. E. Manevich, R. K. Subbotin, E. A. Nikiforov, et al., “Diatomite—siliceous material for the glass industry,” Steklo Keram., No. 5, 34 – 39 (2012); V. E. Manevich, R. K. Subbotin, E. A. Nikiforov, et al., “Diatomite — siliceous material for the glass industry,” Glass Ceram., 69(5 – 6), 68 – 172 (2012).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    A. L. Vinitskii, G. K. Ryabov, N. A. Senik, et al., “Diatomite as a promising raw material for obtaining foam glass,” Sovr. Prom. Grazhd. Stroit-vo, 8(2), 63 – 70 (2012).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    K. S. Ivanov and E. A. Korotkov, “Investigation of the effect of a layer of granulated foam-glass ceramics on the temperature conditions of frozen soil,” Soil Mechanics Foundation Eng., 54(5), 349 – 355 (2017).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    V. E. Sokolovich, “Rapid method of determining the modulus of sodium silicate solution,” Steklo Keram., No. 10, 36 – 37 (1975); V. E. Sokolovich, “Rapid method of determining the modulus of sodium silicate solution,” Glass Ceram., 32(10), 707 – 708 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. E. Grim and R. A. Rowland, “Differential thermal analysis of clay minerals and other hydrous materials. Part 1,” Am. Mineral., 27(11), 746 – 761 (1942).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    S. Raghvan and N. Helfried, “Phase evolution on heat treatment of sodium silicate water glass,” J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 354, 896 – 900 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    D. W. Breck, Zeolite Molecular Sieves: Structure, Chemistry and Use, Wiley, New York (1973).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of the Earth’s Cryosphere at Tyumen Scientific CenterSiberian Branch of the Russian Academy of SciencesTyumenRussia

Personalised recommendations