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Genetic Programming and Evolvable Machines

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 191–220 | Cite as

Evolutionary Scheduling: A Review

  • Emma Hart
  • Peter Ross
  • David Corne
Article

Abstract

Early and seminal work which applied evolutionary computing methods to scheduling problems from 1985 onwards laid a strong and exciting foundation for the work which has been reported over the past decade or so. A survey of the current state-of-the-art was produced in 1999 for the European Network of Excellence on Evolutionary Computing EVONET—this paper provides a more up-to-date overview of the area, reporting on current trends, achievements, and suggesting the way forward.

Keywords

scheduling evolutionary algorithms 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Napier UniversityScotland, UK
  2. 2.University of ExeterUK

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