Geotechnical and Geological Engineering

, Volume 28, Issue 5, pp 671–679 | Cite as

Hydrochemistry and Classification of Groundwater Resources of Ishwardi Municipal Area, Pabna District, Bangladesh

  • Golzar Hossain
  • M. Farhad Howladar
  • Lutfun Nessa
  • Syed Samsuddin Ahmed
  • Chowdhury Quamruzzaman
Original paper

Abstract

The chemical property of groundwater depends largely on the mineralogical composition of the rocks through which the water has moved and the rate of movement and these characteristics of surface water depend on organic and inorganic reactions, industrial effluents, rainfall and temperature etc. The underground water tends to contain more dissolved materials than those in surface water because of their more intimate and longer contact with organic materials of soil and rock particles. The groundwater of the studied area is dominant of alkaline earth’s (Ca2+ and Mg2+) and weak acids (HCO3) which may be classified as Magnesium-Bicarbonate and Calcium Carbonate types. Genetically, the groundwater of the area belongs to both “Normal Chloride” “Normal Sulphate” and “Normal Carbonate” to “Super Carbonate” group. Based on EC, SAR and RC, the groundwater of the area varies from good–excellent quality for irrigation purposes with low alkali hazard and medium salinity hazard.

Keywords

Groundwater Hydrogechemistry Classification of groundwater Ishwardi municipal area 

References

  1. Ahmed SA, et al. (2000) Arsenic: Water Contamination and Health Hazard, pp 7–62Google Scholar
  2. Back W (1961) Origin of hydrochemical facies of groundwater in the Atlantic coastal plain, Int. Geo. Congress. Copenhagen pp 87–95Google Scholar
  3. BWPCB (Bangladesh Water Pollution Control Board) (1976) Water quality standard, 2Google Scholar
  4. Davis J, Exley C (1992) Hydrochemical character of the main aquifer units of Central and North-Eastern Bangladesh and possible toxicity of groundwater to fish and humans, Final Report, British Geol. Survey., Technical Report, WD/92/43RGoogle Scholar
  5. Doneen LD (1967) The influence of crop and soil on percolating waters; Proc. Biennial Conference On Groundwater Recharge, 1961Google Scholar
  6. Gupta HP (1987) Paleoenvironments during holocene time in Bengal Basin, India as reflected by palynostratigraphy. The Paleobotanist 27(2):138–160Google Scholar
  7. Karim SM, Ahmed SS (2002) Ahmed M and Islam S: Arsenic contamination of Ground water of Satma Village, Sharsha Thana, Jessore, University of Rajshahi (in press)Google Scholar
  8. Loyed JW, Heathcote JA et al (1985) Natural inorganic hydrochemistry in relation to groundwater, An introduction. Claredon Press, Oxford 291 pGoogle Scholar
  9. Olson RV, Ellis R Jr (1982) Iron. In: Page AL, Miller RH, Keeney DR (eds) Methods of soil analysis, Part 2, 2nd edn. American Society of Agronomy and Soil Science Society of America, Madison, pp 301–312Google Scholar
  10. Piper AM (1953) A graphic procedure in the geochemical interpretation of water-analysis, USGS Groundwater note, no 12Google Scholar
  11. Todd DK (1980) Groundwater hydrology, 2nd edn. Willey, USA, p 70Google Scholar
  12. WHO (World Health Organization) (1984) Guide line for drinking water quality. WHO, GenevaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Golzar Hossain
    • 1
  • M. Farhad Howladar
    • 2
  • Lutfun Nessa
    • 1
  • Syed Samsuddin Ahmed
    • 1
  • Chowdhury Quamruzzaman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geology and MiningUniversity of RajshahiRajshahiBangladesh
  2. 2.Department of Petroleum and Georesources EngineeringShahjalal University of Science and TechnologySylhetBangladesh

Personalised recommendations