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Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 88, Issue 1, pp 79–90 | Cite as

Extractable Bray-1 phosphorus and crop yields as influenced by addition of phosphatic fertilizers of various solubilities integrated with manure in an acid soil

  • E. W. GikonyoEmail author
  • A. R. Zaharah
  • M. M. Hanafi
  • A. R. Anuar
Research Article

Abstract

Soil extractable Bray-1 P (B1P) and response to phosphate (P) of Setaria anceps cv. Kazungula (Setaria grass) were monitored in a field trial bimonthly for 14 months in an acid soil fertilized with triple super phosphate (TSP), Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR) or Christmas Island phosphate rock (CIPR) integrated with or without manure. Extractable B1P from the same soil incubated with the same fertilizers in wet and dry 3-day cycles for 91 days was determined. Field experimental design was randomized complete block (RCB) with three replications. Results indicated that B1P magnitude for field and incubation trial were; TSP > GPR > CIPR, consistent with their solubility. An integration of manure and fertilizers resulted in much higher extractable B1P than sole fertilizers or manure. Over time, P availability decreased at a fast rate for the first 6 months and later was relatively constant. The dry matter yields (DMYs) exhibited quadratic relationships with P rates. Maximum DMYs (6–11 t ha−1) were attained between 100 and 200 kg P ha−1, above which they declined. Average DMYs were not significantly different for TSP, GPR and CIPR (6.1–6.6 t ha−1). Maximum individual DMY were attained at 2–6 months and then declined to a minimum (2–4 t ha−1) after 1 year. Cumulative yields (20–55 t ha−1) also were not significantly different for the three fertilizers. Manure-CIPR integration increased DMY whilst in GPR and TSP/manure combinations DMYs were depressed. The PRs could supplement the expensive TSP without loss of yields but the non-reactive PR should be integrated with manure.

Keywords

Manure Phosphatic fertilizers Phosphorus availability 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to The Institute of Tropical Agriculture for offering a post-doctoral fellowship and to the Third World Organization of Women in Sciences (TWOWS for the Ph.D. fellowship offer to the first author, Esther W. Gikonyo. The research was conducted at the Department of Land Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia as part of a doctorate degree.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. W. Gikonyo
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • A. R. Zaharah
    • 3
  • M. M. Hanafi
    • 2
  • A. R. Anuar
    • 3
  1. 1.KARI-NARLNairobiKenya
  2. 2.Institute of Tropical AgricultureUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSerdang, SelangorMalaysia
  3. 3.Department of Land Management, Faculty of AgricultureUniversiti Putra MalaysiaSerdang, SelangorMalaysia

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