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Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

, Volume 73, Issue 2–3, pp 293–301 | Cite as

Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Rice Field and Related Microorganism in Black Soil, Northeastern China

  • Jin Yue
  • Yi Shi
  • Wei Liang
  • Jie Wu
  • Chenrui Wang
  • Guohong Huang
Article

Abstract

Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from rice field in black soil were measured in situ by using static chamber techniques during crop growth season in 2001. The experiment fields were divided into three plots for three different treatments, one with continuous flooded and applying urea (CU), one with continuous flooded and applying slow-releasing urea (CS), and one with intermittent irrigation and applying urea (IU). Under the same fertilization application, compared with continuous flooded, intermittent irrigation can significantly reduce CH4 emission and increase N2O emission. But, integrated global warming potentials (GWPS) of CH4 and N2O emission were reduced greatly, while rice yield was not affected. So, the intermittent irrigation is an effective measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from paddy fields. The amount of CH4 emission during rice-growing season for the three treatments was all much lower than that from any other region in China. There was a trade-off relationship between CH4 and N2O emissions. We also measured the numbers of methanogens, methanotrophs, nitrifiers and denitrifers from rice field at various growth stages in 2001. Bacteria populations were estimated by the most probable number (MPN) method. Regression analyses show CH4 emissions were closely related to methanogens population for all the three treatments. There was a positive correlation between denitrifiers population level and N2O emission in the treatment of IU.

Keywords

Black soil Denitrifiers Methane Methanogens Methanotrophs Nitrifiers Nitrous oxide Rice field 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jin Yue
    • 1
  • Yi Shi
    • 1
  • Wei Liang
    • 1
  • Jie Wu
    • 1
  • Chenrui Wang
    • 1
  • Guohong Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Institute of Applied EcologyChinese Academy of SciencesShenyangP.R. China

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