Advertisement

Foundations of Science

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 425–428 | Cite as

Towards a Phenomenology of Technologically Mediated Moral Change: Or, What Could Mark Zuckerberg Learn from Caregivers in the Southern Netherlands?

  • Tamar SharonEmail author
Commentary
  • 700 Downloads

Abstract

Kamphof offers an illuminating depiction of the technological mediation of morality. Her case serves as the basis for a plea for modesty up and against the somewhat heroic conceptualizations of techno-moral change to date—less logos, less autos, more practice, more relationality. Rather than a displacement of these conceptualizations, I question whether Kamphof’s art of living offers only a different perspective: in scale (as a micro-event of techno-moral change), and in unit of analysis (as an art of living oriented to relations with others rather than the relation to the self). As a supplement and not an alternative, this modest art has nonetheless audacious implications for the ethics of surveillance.

Keywords

Techno-moral change Mediation Surveillance Privacy Care Social media 

References

  1. Nissenbaum, H. (2009). Privacy in context: Technology, policy and the integrity of social life. Standford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Regan, P. M. (2003). Privacy and commercial use of personal data: Policy developments in the United States. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 11(1), 12–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtNetherlands

Personalised recommendations