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An ad hoc process mining approach to discover patient paths of an Emergency Department

  • Davide Duma
  • Roberto Aringhieri
Article

Abstract

The Emergency Department (ED) management presents a really high complexity due to the admissions of patients with a wide variety of diseases and different urgency, which require the execution of different activities involving human and medical resources. This can have an impact on ED overcrowding that may affect the quality and access of health care. In this paper we propose an ad hoc process mining approach to discover the paths of the patients served by an ED. Our aim is to obtain a process model capable (1) to replicate properly the possible patient paths, and (2) to predict the next activities in the view of a possible application to online optimisation. To prove its effectiveness, we apply our ad hoc approach to a real case study.

Keywords

Emergency Department Overcrowding Process mining Patient flow 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Alessandra Farina, Elena Scola and Filippo Marconcini of the ED at Ospedale Sant’Antonio Abate di Cantù for the fruitful collaboration and for providing us the dataset and allowing their use in this paper. The authors wish to thank the anonymous reviewers for their accurate reports and valuable suggestions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dipartimento di InformaticaUniversità degli Studi di TorinoTurinItaly

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