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Fire Technology

, Volume 52, Issue 1, pp 5–24 | Cite as

Validation of Fire Models Applied to Nuclear Power Plant Safety

  • Kevin McGrattanEmail author
  • Richard Peacock
  • Kristopher Overholt
Article

Abstract

The paper highlights key components of a fire model validation study conducted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute. These include the selection of fire phenomena of interest to nuclear power plant safety, the selection of appropriate models, the selection of relevant experimental data, and the selection of appropriate evaluation criteria. For each model and each quantity of interest, there are two metrics of accuracy. The first is a bias factor, which indicates the extent to which the model tends to over or under-predict the given quantity. The second is a relative standard deviation, which indicates the degree of scatter in the predicted quantity when compared with experimental measurements. While the study is motivated by nuclear power plant safety, the general procedure and results are appropriate for most industrial applications.

Keywords

Fire modeling Model validation Nuclear power plants 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Support for this work has been provided by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. Special thanks to the other participants in the NRC/EPRI validation study: David Stroup, NRC Office of Research, Ashley Lindeman, EPRI, Francisco Joglar, Susan LeStrange, and Sara Montanez of Hughes Associates, Inc.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (Outside USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin McGrattan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Richard Peacock
    • 1
  • Kristopher Overholt
    • 1
  1. 1.Fire Research DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyGaithersburgUSA

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