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Fire Technology

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 497–529 | Cite as

Respiratory Exposure Study for Fire Fighters and Other Emergency Responders

  • Casey C. Grant
Article

Abstract

This study provides a literature review of prior research on respiratory exposure for fire fighters and other emergency responders, and includes an information collection effort that provides a summary review of field measurement technology and selected fire department Standard Operating Procedures and Standard Operating Guidelines (SOPs/SOGs) relating to respiratory exposure. The purpose of this study is to raise awareness on the need for emergency responder respiratory protection, promote and support specific fire service respiratory exposure related research, and to help develop best practice fire service guidance for determining when to use and discontinue use of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) and other respiratory protective equipment. The applications of primary focus include atmospheres that are possibly hazardous yet tenable, such as during overhaul operations, fighting outdoor fires, or limited exposure situations.

Keywords

emergency response fire fighters fire fighting fire service overhaul respiratory exposure 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study has been made possible through funding from the National Fire Protection Association.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fire Protection Research FoundationQuincyUSA

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