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Familial Cancer

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 351–355 | Cite as

Developing and assessing the utility of a You-Tube based clinical genetics video channel for families affected by inherited tumours

  • G. E. Jones
  • J. H. Singletary
  • A. Cashmore
  • V. Jain
  • J. Abhulimhen
  • J. Chauhan
  • H. V. Musson
  • J. G. Barwell
Letter to the Editor

Abstract

We have designed and implemented the first worldwide You Tube channel with 22 videos covering common questions asked in familial cancer susceptibility clinics. We discuss the use of the videos including demographics of registered You Tube users, and what lessons have been learnt about how the general public uses medical information online. The most popular video on inheritance patterns has been watched on average 84 times per month. The mostly highly viewed videos include inheritance patterns, breast cancer screening and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Registered viewers were more commonly male and the average age of the registered user was 45–54 years; similar to that seen in Genetics Clinics suggesting that age may not be a major barrier to access to this type of information for patients. The videos have been viewed in more than 140 countries confirming that there is clearly an audience for this type of information. Patient feedback questionnaires indicate that these videos provide a useful aide memoir for the clinic appointment, and most people would recommend them to others. In summary, You Tube videos are easy and cost effective to make. They have the ability to disseminate genetics education to a worldwide audience and may be a useful adjunct to clinical appointments.

Keywords

You Tube Internet Inherited cancer susceptibility Genetic counselling 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to acknowledge the support from the Genetics Education Networking for Innovation & Excellence at the University of Leicester (GENIE). We would also like to thank all those who participated in the production of the videos.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Jones
    • 1
  • J. H. Singletary
    • 2
  • A. Cashmore
    • 2
  • V. Jain
    • 1
  • J. Abhulimhen
    • 2
  • J. Chauhan
    • 2
  • H. V. Musson
    • 2
  • J. G. Barwell
    • 1
  1. 1.Leicester Clinical Genetics DepartmentUniversity Hospitals Leicester NHS TrustLeicesterUK
  2. 2.Department of GeneticsUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK

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