Familial Cancer

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 297–301 | Cite as

Mutation deep within an intron of MSH2 causes Lynch syndrome

  • Mark Clendenning
  • Daniel D. Buchanan
  • Michael D. Walsh
  • Belinda Nagler
  • Christophe Rosty
  • Bryony Thompson
  • Amanda B. Spurdle
  • John L. Hopper
  • Mark A. Jenkins
  • Joanne P. Young
Article

Abstract

Lynch syndrome, a heritable form of cancer predisposition, is caused by germline mutations within genes of the DNA mismatch repair family, and can be rapidly identified in young onset cancer patients through the detection of loss of expression of at least one of these genes in tumour samples. To date, such causative mutations have only been identified within exonic and splice site regions. Though this approach has been successful in the majority of families, a considerable number remain in which no mutation has been found. To address this situation, we used an alternative mutation discovery procedure which involved haplotype analysis of the locus containing the gene lost in the tumour and delineation of segregating haplotypes, followed by an investigation of splicing aberrations to uncover cryptic splice sites which lay outside the genomic regions routinely examined for mutations. In this report, we show that an intronic mutation 478 bp upstream of exon 2 in the MSH2 gene causes Lynch syndrome through creation of a novel splice donor site with subsequent pseudoexon activation, thus highlighting the need for more extensive sequencing approaches in families where routine procedures fail to find a mutation.

Keywords

Lynch syndrome MSH2 Novel mutation mechanism 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank individual participants in the study who made this work possible and the contribution of the Jeremy Jass Memorial Pathology Collection. This work was funded by the National Cancer Institute, under RFA no. CA-95-011, and through a cooperative agreement with the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (U01 CA097735). The content of this manuscript does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the National Cancer Institute nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organisations imply endorsement by the US Government. JY is a Cancer Council Queensland Senior Research Fellow.

Supplementary material

10689_2011_9427_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (74 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 74 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Clendenning
    • 1
  • Daniel D. Buchanan
    • 1
  • Michael D. Walsh
    • 1
  • Belinda Nagler
    • 1
  • Christophe Rosty
    • 1
  • Bryony Thompson
    • 2
  • Amanda B. Spurdle
    • 2
  • John L. Hopper
    • 3
  • Mark A. Jenkins
    • 3
  • Joanne P. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Familial Cancer Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical ResearchHerstonAustralia
  2. 2.Molecular Cancer Epidemiology, Queensland Institute of Medical ResearchHerstonAustralia
  3. 3.Centre for Molecular, Environmental, Genetic and Analytic Epidemiology, Melbourne School of Population HealthThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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