Evolutionary Ecology

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 63–79

Low repeatability of preferred body temperature in four species of Cordylid lizards: Temporal variation and implications for adaptive significance

  • Susana Clusella Trullas
  • John S. Terblanche
  • Johannes H. van Wyk
  • James R. Spotila
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10682-006-9124-x

Cite this article as:
Clusella Trullas, S., Terblanche, J.S., van Wyk, J.H. et al. Evol Ecol (2007) 21: 63. doi:10.1007/s10682-006-9124-x

Abstract

Preferred body temperatures (Tsel) of ectotherms are important for ecological and evolutionary studies. In lizards, the measurement of Tsel is controversial for several reasons, generally related to hypotheses addressing how Tsel may evolve in the wild. Although seldom explicitly tested, evolutionary hypotheses of adaptation to local climate require that Tsel meets the conditions of natural selection, which include repeatability, heritability and a link to fitness. Here, we investigated repeatability (τ, intra-class correlation coefficient) of Tsel at several time-scales using four Cordylid species from heterogeneous thermal habitats. Although there was significant inter-individual variation within days (P < 0.005 in most cases), there was no significant inter-individual variation when calculated across several days (P > 0.05). Repeatability was low in all species investigated (from 0 to 0.482) when compared against other estimates of repeatability of Tsel in the literature. Irrespective of how Tsel was calculated, it showed inconsistent and variable temporal effects across species. Furthermore, repeatability of Tsel did not change with acclimation to laboratory conditions. These data have implications for understanding the evolution of thermoregulation in these and other ectotherms.

Keywords

Thermoregulation Coadaptation Inter-individual variation Selection Temporal effects Cordylus 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susana Clusella Trullas
    • 1
    • 2
  • John S. Terblanche
    • 3
  • Johannes H. van Wyk
    • 2
  • James R. Spotila
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bioscience and BiotechnologyDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Ecophysiology laboratory, Department of Botany and ZoologyUniversity of StellenboschMatielandSouth Africa
  3. 3.Centre for Invasion BiologyUniversity of StellenboschMatielandSouth Africa

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