Euphytica

, Volume 192, Issue 3, pp 347–357 | Cite as

Function of TaGW2-6A and its effect on grain weight in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

  • Xinye Zhang
  • Jiansheng Chen
  • Cuilan Shi
  • Junnan Chen
  • Feifei Zheng
  • Jichun Tian
Article

Abstract

Grain weight is an important factor contributing to grain yield in wheat. Markers closely linked to grain weight could be used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) to accelerate the wheat breeding process. In this paper, a second backcross recombinant inbred line (BC2F4) population, a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, and one natural population were used to study the relationship between allelic variants of the grain weight gene TaGW2-6A and grain weight, width, and length with the goal of verifying the feasibility using the functional marker Hap-6A-P1/P2 in MAS. The differences in average grain weight, width, and length between haplotypes Hap-6A-G and Hap-6A-A were 8.09 g, 0.22 mm, and 0.38 mm, respectively, in the BC2F4 population; 4.01 g, 0.11 mm, and 0.10 mm in the RIL population; and 3.95 g, 0.10 mm, and 0.20 mm in the natural population. All the differences were significant. Sequencing results of the products of second round PCR indicated that a 167 bp TaqI restriction fragment had been generated from small-grain-size materials because of three TaqI restriction sites (TCGA). However, the large-grain-size variant generated a 218 bp fragment due to a single-nucleotide mutation (SNP) (TCGA → TCGG) at the third site. TaGW2-6A expression levels were negative with respect to grain width, length, and weight. For this reason, Hap-6A-G was considered a superior allele. These results contradict those of a previous study, which showed Hap-6A-A to be significantly associated with wider grain and higher grain weight.

Keywords

Grain width Allelic variation TaGW2-6A 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinye Zhang
    • 1
  • Jiansheng Chen
    • 1
  • Cuilan Shi
    • 1
  • Junnan Chen
    • 1
  • Feifei Zheng
    • 1
  • Jichun Tian
    • 1
  1. 1.The State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology/Group of Wheat Quality BreedingCollege of Agriculture, Shandong Agricultural UniversityTai’anPeople’s Republic of China

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