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Euphytica

, Volume 173, Issue 3, pp 345–356 | Cite as

Induction of Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi) resistance in garden pea using induced mutagenesis and in vitro selection techniques

  • Akhilesh SharmaEmail author
  • Rajeev Rathour
  • P. Plaha
  • Viveka Katoch
  • G. S. Khalsa
  • Vandana Patial
  • Yudhvir Singh
  • N. K. Pathania
Article

Abstract

Wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi is a serious production constraint for peas worldwide. An attempt was made to isolate wilt-resistant mutants in two susceptible pea genotypes, Arkel and Azad P-1, employing induced mutagenesis and in vitro selection techniques. Two thousand seeds of each genotype were mutagenized either with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS, 0.2% and 0.3%) or gamma rays (5-22.5 kR) in 60Co gamma cell for three consecutive years. Screening of different mutagenized populations under wilt-sick plots resulted in the isolation of 25 mutants exhibiting complete or enhanced wilt resistance compared to parental genotypes. Five of these wilt-resistant mutants also outperformed the susceptible background genotypes in terms of yield and other horticultural traits. Efforts were also made to isolate wilt-resistant regenerants from callus cultures exhibiting insensitivity to culture filtrate (CF) of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi. A total of 250 regenerants (R 0) were obtained from CF-insensitive calli selected from medium supplemented with 20% culture filtrate. When evaluated in artificially inoculated sick plots, only five R 2 lines obtained from the regenerants exhibited enhanced wilt resistance compared to parental cultivars. However, the selected lines did not exhibit resistance levels equivalent to those shown by wilt-resistant lines isolated through in vivo mutagenesis. To conclude, induced mutagenesis through irradiation and EMS treatments exhibited superiority over in vitro selection for inducing wilt resistance in peas.

Keywords

Culture filtrate EMS Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi Irradiation Mutation Pisum sativum L. Resistance 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge the financial assistance provided by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi for the work reported in this manuscript.

Supplementary material

10681_2009_99_MOESM1_ESM.doc (40 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 39 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akhilesh Sharma
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rajeev Rathour
    • 2
  • P. Plaha
    • 2
  • Viveka Katoch
    • 1
  • G. S. Khalsa
    • 1
  • Vandana Patial
    • 2
  • Yudhvir Singh
    • 1
  • N. K. Pathania
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Vegetable Science and FloricultureCollege of Agriculture, H.P. Agricultural UniversityPalampurIndia
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural BiotechnologyH.P. Agricultural UniversityPalampurIndia

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