Euphytica

, Volume 164, Issue 2, pp 509–514 | Cite as

Double haploids, markers and QTL analysis in vegetable brassicas

  • David Pink
  • Liz Bailey
  • Sandy McClement
  • Paul Hand
  • Evy Mathas
  • Vicky Buchanan-Wollaston
  • Dave Astley
  • Graham King
  • Graham Teakle
Article

Abstract

Double haploid (DH) plants of Brassica spp. can be produced via anther culture or culture of microspores. This paper reviews the uses of double haploids in crop improvement research in vegetable brassicas (B. oleracea). Applications of DH lines are described for breeding; construction of linkage maps; genetic analysis of quantitative traits and capturing genetic variation. The advantages and disadvantages of DH lines are discussed

Keywords

Double haploids Microspore culture Anther culture Brassicas Linkage maps Plant breeding 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Pink
    • 1
  • Liz Bailey
    • 1
  • Sandy McClement
    • 1
  • Paul Hand
    • 1
  • Evy Mathas
    • 1
  • Vicky Buchanan-Wollaston
    • 1
  • Dave Astley
    • 1
  • Graham King
    • 2
  • Graham Teakle
    • 1
  1. 1.Warwick HRIWarwick UniversityWarwickUK
  2. 2.Rothamsted ResearchHertfordshireUK

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