Euphytica

, Volume 151, Issue 3, pp 383–391 | Cite as

Gene flow from transgenic wheat and barley under field conditions

  • Keith T. Gatford
  • Zainuddin Basri
  • Jane Edlington
  • Julia Lloyd
  • Javed A. Qureshi
  • Richard Brettell
  • Geoffrey B. Fincher
Original Article

Abstract

In this study the frequency and distance of gene flow from transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) to non-transgenic wheat and barley crops was investigated under local field conditions. Trials were conducted in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and in South Australia (SA). Gene flow from transgenic wheat was confirmed at frequencies of 0.012% and 0.0037% in the ACT and SA, respectively. In both trials gene flow occurred over distances of less than 12 m. Gene flow was also detected from transgenic barley at a frequency of 0.005%, over a distance of less than 12 m. The results show that under Australian field conditions, gene flow occurs at extremely low frequencies and over very short distances. Physical separation of transgenic and non-transgenic cereal crops by greater than 12 m should ensure that contamination of adjacent non-transgenic cereal crops remains less than 0.02%, well below the level permitted under Australian regulations.

Keywords

Biosafety Cereals Gene flow Genetic manipulation Segregation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith T. Gatford
    • 1
  • Zainuddin Basri
    • 1
  • Jane Edlington
    • 2
  • Julia Lloyd
    • 1
  • Javed A. Qureshi
    • 1
  • Richard Brettell
    • 3
  • Geoffrey B. Fincher
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Agriculture and Wine and The Australian Centre for Plant Functional GenomicsThe University of AdelaideGlen OsmondAustralia
  2. 2.CSIRO Division of Plant IndustryCanberraAustralia
  3. 3.Grains Research & Development CorporationKingstonAustralia

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