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Addressing the Underemployment of Persons with Disabilities: Recommendations for Expanding Organizational Social Responsibility

  • Karen S. MarkelEmail author
  • Lizabeth A. Barclay
Article

Abstract

The underemployment of persons with disabilities continues to be a societal problem; many persons with disabilities have difficulty securing and maintaining employment. This difficulty contributes to the relatively higher rates of poverty among persons with disabilities as well as their underutilization as productive members of society. This research examines factors that contribute to this underemployment problem. Based on this examination, we develop questions organizations must consider for addressing the problem. These questions are based on creating working relationships for persons with disabilities at an individual level that may be an extension of an organization’s corporate social responsibility program. Individuals with disabilities have a right to obtain and maintain successful employment opportunities; this research outlines the factors at play and provides suggestions for employers to consider in addressing this social problem.

Key words

corporate social responsibility disability underemployment human resource management 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ManagementOakland UniversityRochesterUSA

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