Educational Research for Policy and Practice

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 235–247 | Cite as

Quality assurance in the Singapore education system in an era of diversity and innovation

Original Article

Abstract

This paper describes how Singapore attempts to balance the need for quality assurance and the need for educational diversity and innovation. The Singapore experience shows that this is a delicate balance. On the one hand, to promote diversity and innovation, the government attempts to decentralise its power to the schools. On the other hand, for quality assurance, the government sets up quality structures that reassert the centrality of government control. This paper examines the implications of such a strategy and the challenges that schools face in navigating a new paradigm of diversity and innovation while satisfying the requirements of quality assurance.

Keywords

School Excellence- Self-appraisal Quality Innovation Diversity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeRepublic of Singapore

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