The Environmentalist

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 505–510 | Cite as

Modulated microwave effects on individuals with depressive disorder

  • Maie Bachmann
  • Hiie Hinrikus
  • Kaire Aadamsoo
  • Ülle Võhma
  • Jaanus Lass
  • Jekaterina Rubljova
  • Anna Suhhova
  • Viiu Tuulik
Article

Abstract

This study was aimed to evaluate differences in the effect of microwave exposure on patients with depressive disorder and healthy subjects. Our experiments were carried out on a group of depressive patients (women, 18 subjects) and comparison group of healthy volunteers (women, 18 subjects) exposed during 30 min to 450 MHz microwave radiation modulated at 1,000 Hz frequency. The field power density at the scalp was 0.9 mW/cm2. As a subjective criteria of microwave effect, the Brief Affect Scale (BAS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and after each exposure procedure were used. The analysis of EEG was performed and ratio of the EEG beta and theta power was selected as a measure for evaluation of the microwave effect. The BAS and VAS revealed rather improvement in subjective mood score after exposure for majority of depressive subjects (11) and no changes for others (7). The EEG analysis detected differences between calculated parameters for exposed and sham recordings in depression as well as healthy group. Statistically significant changes were introduced by microwave for five patients with depressive disorder and for one healthy subject. The rate of subjects affected by microwave in depression group (28%) was five times higher compared to that rate in healthy group (5.6%).

Keywords

EMF effects Depression Brief affect scale EEG analysis Quantitative EEG 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maie Bachmann
    • 1
  • Hiie Hinrikus
    • 1
  • Kaire Aadamsoo
    • 2
  • Ülle Võhma
    • 2
  • Jaanus Lass
    • 1
  • Jekaterina Rubljova
    • 1
  • Anna Suhhova
    • 1
  • Viiu Tuulik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical EngineeringTechnomedicum of Tallinn University of Technology TallinnEstonia
  2. 2.Clinic of PsychiatryNorth Estonia Regional HospitalTallinnEstonia

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