Environment, Development and Sustainability

, Volume 12, Issue 6, pp 1013–1024

An evaluation of fishery co-management experience in an Amazonian black-water river (Unini River, Amazon, Brazil)

  • Thaissa Sobreiro
  • Carlos Edwar de Carvalho Freitas
  • Karen Lorena Prado
  • Fabíola Aquino do Nascimento
  • Rafaela Vicentini
  • Aprígio Mota Moraes
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10668-010-9238-8

Cite this article as:
Sobreiro, T., de Carvalho Freitas, C.E., Prado, K.L. et al. Environ Dev Sustain (2010) 12: 1013. doi:10.1007/s10668-010-9238-8

Abstract

We evaluated the implementation of a fishing agreement, which was created by negotiation among all users of the resources as a co-management strategy because its definition was a result of meetings between all users of the resources. The fishing agreement was implemented in Unini River, a tributary of the right bank of Negro River. Our approach was based on the perception of the people who live in that area, called ribeirinhos. The management strategy was based on spatial distribution of the different types of fishing. We used two logistic regression models to identify the variables which are important to determine the previous concordance and satisfaction with the agreement. First, we analyzed the initial effort to implement the agreement. The variable that influenced the decision of support for the agreement and satisfaction with the results of agreement in both models was the distance from the interviewee’s residence to the sport fishing area. The results showed that the perception of improvement in well-being of the communities and structured social organization are crucial for the success of the co-management strategy.

Keywords

Small-scale fisheries Conflicts Co-management Amazonian fisheries 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thaissa Sobreiro
    • 1
  • Carlos Edwar de Carvalho Freitas
    • 1
  • Karen Lorena Prado
    • 1
  • Fabíola Aquino do Nascimento
    • 1
  • Rafaela Vicentini
    • 2
  • Aprígio Mota Moraes
    • 3
  1. 1.Federal University of Amazonas—UFAMManausBrazil
  2. 2.Biodiversity Conservation Chico Mendes Institute/CEPAMManausBrazil
  3. 3.Amazon Research Institute, INPA/CPBA/LPPManausBrazil

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