Environment, Development and Sustainability

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 561–571 | Cite as

Sustainability indicators for clean development mechanism projects in Vietnam

  • Jean Hugé
  • Hai Le Trinh
  • Pham Hoang Hai
  • Jan Kuilman
  • Luc Hens
Article

Abstract

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is one of the flexible instruments of the Kyoto Protocol designed to combat climate change so as to bring advantages to developing countries and developed countries alike. Indeed, CDM projects have a two-fold objective: to offset greenhouse gas emissions and to contribute to sustainable development in the host country. However in many cases, the latter objective appears to be marginalized. This is at least partly due to the difficulties surrounding the definition and the measurement of sustainability, in particular in a developing country context. To assess CDM projects’ contribution to sustainable development in the host country, scholars and practitioners need adapted indicator sets. A set of indicators were developed by way of an iterative Delphi approach amongst selected Vietnamese experts. The Delphi approach allowed a systematic collection of the experts’ judgements on the sustainability indicators through a set of sequentially applied questionnaires, interspersed with feedback from earlier responses. This exercise resulted in the selection of a set of 36 indicators, which emphasise economic efficiency, public health and pollution issues. The exercise yielded a locally supported and context-specific set of sustainability indicators that will allow Vietnamese decision-makers to enhance the sustainability of the approved CDM projects. In the future this set should be continually improved through real-life application and further participation from local stakeholders. This study is a first step in a long-term process towards developing an adapted toolkit for sustainability assessment of CDM projects in Vietnam.

Keywords

Sustainable development Clean development mechanism Indicators Delphi Vietnam 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Hugé
    • 1
  • Hai Le Trinh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pham Hoang Hai
    • 2
  • Jan Kuilman
    • 1
  • Luc Hens
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Ecology DepartmentVrije Universiteit BrusselBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Institute of GeographyVietnamese Academy of Science and TechnologyHanoiVietnam

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