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Environment, Development and Sustainability

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 319–336 | Cite as

Ethanol From Corn: Clean Renewable Fuel for the Future, or Drain on Our Resources and Pockets?

  • Tad W. PatzekEmail author
  • S.-M. Anti
  • R. Campos
  • K. W. ha
  • J. Lee
  • B. Li
  • J. Padnick
  • S.-A. Yee
Article

Abstract

It is shown here that one burns 1 gallon of gasoline equivalent in fossil fuels to produce 1 gallon of gasoline equivalent as ethanol from corn. When this corn ethanol is burned as a gasoline additive or fuel, its use amounts to burning the same amount of fuel twice to drive a car once. Therefore, the fuel efficiency of those cars that burn corn ethanol is halved. The widespread use of corn ethanol will cause manifold damage to air, surface water, soil and aquifers. The overall energy balance of corn conversion to ethanol demonstrates that 65% of the input energy is lost during the conversion. Carbon dioxide sequestration by corn is nullified when corn ethanol is burned, and there will be additional carbon dioxide, nitrous oxides, and sulfur oxide emissions from the fossil fuels used to produce the ethanol.

Keywords

carbon dioxide corn energy balance ethanol fuel nitrate oxygenate pollution sequestration 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tad W. Patzek
    • 1
    Email author
  • S.-M. Anti
    • 1
  • R. Campos
    • 1
  • K. W. ha
    • 1
  • J. Lee
    • 1
  • B. Li
    • 1
  • J. Padnick
    • 1
  • S.-A. Yee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of California Berkeley

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