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Journal of Engineering Mathematics

, Volume 58, Issue 1–4, pp 141–148 | Cite as

On the evaluation of quadratic forces on stationary bodies

  • Chang-Ho LeeEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Conservation of momentum is applied to a finite fluid volume surrounding a body and enclosed by a control surface in order to obtain expressions for all components of quadratic forces and moments acting on the body in terms of the momentum flux and the change of the momentum in the fluid volume. It is shown that the expressions derived are essentially identical with those obtained by a complementary approach given by Dai et al. (2005, computation of low-frequency loads by the middle-field formulation. In: Grue J (ed) 20th workshop for water waves and floating bodies. Longyearbyen, Norway, pp 47–50) where the pressure integrals on the body surface are transformed into integrals on the control surface using various vector theorems. Computational results limited to the mean drift forces are presented to illustrate the advantages of using control surfaces.

Keywords

Control surface Mean drift force Momentum conservation Pressure integration Quadratic force 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.WAMIT Inc.Chestnut HillUSA

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