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Respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms associated with pesticide management practices among farmers in Ghana’s most important vegetable hub

  • Reginald QuansahEmail author
  • John R. Bend
  • Frederick Ato Armah
  • Felix Bonney
  • Joshua Aseidu
  • David Oscar Yawson
  • Michael Osei Adu
  • Isaac Luginaah
  • David Kofi Essumang
  • Abukari Abdul-Rahaman
  • Samuel Cobbina
  • Samuel Iddi
  • Matthew Tersigni
  • Samuel Afful
  • Peter Osei-Fosu
  • Edward Nketiah-Amponsah
Article
  • 31 Downloads

Abstract

The data presented here are from the Offinso North District Farm Health Study (ONFAHS), a population-based cross-sectional study among vegetable farmers in Ghana. The paper addresses knowledge, pesticide handling practices, and protective measures related to pesticide use by self-reported symptoms for 310 adult farmers who completed a comprehensive questionnaire on pesticide management practices and health. In addition, an inventory was prepared using information supplied by pesticide sellers/dealers in this district. We report that cough and wheezing (but not breathlessness) are positively associated with stirring pesticide preparations with bare hands/drinking water while mixing/applying pesticides, and stirring pesticide preparations with bare hands/drinking water/smoking cigarettes while mixing/applying pesticides. There is a significant exposure-response association between the number of precautionary measures practiced while handling pesticides and cough and wheezing but not with breathlessness. We also found unsafe practices to be associated with sexual dysfunction, nervousness, and lack of concentration. The results also suggest a negative association between practice of any precautionary measure when mixing/applying pesticides and sexual dysfunction, nervousness, and lack of concentration. We found that in spite of the fact that farmers have adequate knowledge about the environment and health effects of pesticides, several unhygienic practices are in widespread use, indicating that knowledge is not necessarily always translated in action. Further action is necessary to promote the safe use of pesticides and to replace existing poor management practices among these and other farmers in Ghana.

Keywords

Farms Ghana Pesticide handling Safety Vegetable farmers Symptoms 

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reginald Quansah
    • 1
    Email author
  • John R. Bend
    • 2
  • Frederick Ato Armah
    • 3
  • Felix Bonney
    • 4
  • Joshua Aseidu
    • 1
  • David Oscar Yawson
    • 2
  • Michael Osei Adu
    • 2
  • Isaac Luginaah
    • 5
  • David Kofi Essumang
    • 6
  • Abukari Abdul-Rahaman
    • 1
  • Samuel Cobbina
    • 7
  • Samuel Iddi
    • 8
  • Matthew Tersigni
    • 9
  • Samuel Afful
    • 10
  • Peter Osei-Fosu
    • 11
  • Edward Nketiah-Amponsah
    • 12
  1. 1.Biological, Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, College of Health SciencesUniversity of GhanaAccraGhana
  2. 2.Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Siebens Drake Medical Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine & DentistryWestern UniversityLondonCanada
  3. 3.Department of Environmental Science, School of Biological Sciences, College of Agriculture & Natural SciencesUniversity of Cape CoastCape CoastGhana
  4. 4.Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-Africa Institute of Sanitation and Waste ManagementAccraGhana
  5. 5.Department of GeographyWestern UniversityOntarioCanada
  6. 6.Environmental Health Group, Department of ChemistryUniversity of Cape CoastCape CoastGhana
  7. 7.Department of Ecotourism and Environmental Management, Faculty of Renewable Natural ResourcesUniversity for Development StudiesNyankpalaGhana
  8. 8.Department of StatisticsUniversity of GhanaAccraGhana
  9. 9.Schulich Interfaculty Program in Public HealthWestern UniversityLondonCanada
  10. 10.Nuclear Chemistry and Envirionmental Research CentreGhana Atomic Energy CommissionAccraGhana
  11. 11.Pesticide UnitGhana Standards AuthorityAccraGhana
  12. 12.Department of EconomicsUniversity of GhanaLegonGhana

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