Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 185, Issue 7, pp 5461–5469

Levels of heavy metals in tissues of shingi fish (Heteropneustes fossilis) from Buriganga River, Bangladesh

  • Aleya Begum
  • Ahmed Ismail Mustafa
  • Md. Nurul Amin
  • Tasrina Rabia Chowdhury
  • Shamshad Begum Quraishi
  • Nasrin Banu
Article

Abstract

Heavy metal pollution was reported in commercially valuable freshwater edible fish in the Buriganga River, Bangladesh. The concentrations of As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn, and Cu were investigated in the muscle, gill, stomach, intestine, and liver of Heteropneustes fossilis caught at three stations to assess the degree of fish pollution by heavy metals. Significant differences in concentrations of analyzed elements were observed among different tissues, but not among the stations. The ranges of the measured concentrations (μg/g dry weight) in the tissues of H. fossilis were as follows: arsenic concentration was (0.2–0.4), (0.82–0.90), (3.29–3.99), (2.20–2.80), and (2.41–2.90), that of lead was (1.79–2.20), (4.95–6.55), (10.36–13.38), (5.74–9.70), and (18.20–18.79), that of cadmium was (0.3–0.4), (2.87–4.27), (1.03–1.63), (1.55–4.59), and (2.25–5.50), that of chromium was (1.40–1.70), (3.52–3.72), (2.28–5.29), (2.77–3.79), and (4.25–8.65), that of zinc was (24.47–28.82), (16.82–18.80), (20.22–22.20), (22.86–26.68), and (60.82–67.80), and that of copper was (7.80–8.50), (6.22–6.81), (38.21–44.25), (17.07–21.03), and (43.24–47.30) in the muscle, gill, stomach, intestine, and liver, respectively. This research showed that the liver appeared to be the main heavy metal storage tissue, while the muscle had the lowest levels of analyzed metals. The concentrations of metal in the muscles not exceeded the acceptable levels for a food source for human consumption.

Keywords

Bioaccumulation Heavy metal Buriganga River Fish tissues Bangladesh 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aleya Begum
    • 1
  • Ahmed Ismail Mustafa
    • 2
  • Md. Nurul Amin
    • 2
  • Tasrina Rabia Chowdhury
    • 3
  • Shamshad Begum Quraishi
    • 3
  • Nasrin Banu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of DhakaDhakaBangladesh
  2. 2.Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringUniversity of DhakaDhakaBangladesh
  3. 3.Chemistry DivisionAtomic Energy Centre, Bangladesh Atomic Energy CommissionDhakaBangladesh

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