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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 165, Issue 1–4, pp 97–102 | Cite as

Heavy metal concentrations in water, sediment, and tissues of two fish species (Triplohysa pappenheimi, Gobio hwanghensis) from the Lanzhou section of the Yellow River, China

  • Yimin Wang
  • Peng Chen
  • Ruina Cui
  • Wantong Si
  • Yingmei Zhang
  • Weihong Ji
Article

Abstract

In order to assess the condition of heavy metal pollution in the Yellow River, Lanzhou section, China, and to quantify heavy metal (copper, lead, zinc, and cadmium) contents in tissues (liver, kidney, gills, and muscles) of two fish species (Triplophysa pappenheimi and Gobio hwanghensis), levels of these four metals in the water body, sediment, and tissues of the two fish were measured using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The metal levels from this study were compared with the threshold values in the guidelines of water, sediment, and food given by the National Environmental Protection Agency of China, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of America, and the National Standards Management Department of China. We found the mean concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd in THE water body, sediment, and muscles of two fish species were far below the values in guidelines. We also found that the type of metals present and their concentrations varied in different tissues and species. The results suggested that (1) Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd did not contaminate the aquatic ecosystem severely and did not threaten the safety of human consumption in the Yellow River, Lanzhou section, and (2) organs that are sensitive to accumulating heavy metals may be useful to develop bioindicators for monitoring metal contamination. Considering environmental variables, further study is necessary before deciding which fish species or tissue could be the ideal bioindicators for aquatic pollution.

Keywords

Heavy metal Pollution Concentration Fish Risk assessment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yimin Wang
    • 1
  • Peng Chen
    • 1
  • Ruina Cui
    • 1
  • Wantong Si
    • 1
  • Yingmei Zhang
    • 1
  • Weihong Ji
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Life SciencesLanzhou UniversityGansuChina

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