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Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

, Volume 129, Issue 1–3, pp 169–178 | Cite as

Temporal Trends of Young-of-Year Fishes in Lake Erie and Comparison of Diel Sampling Periods

  • Martin A. StapanianEmail author
  • Michael T. Bur
  • Jean V. Adams
Article

Abstract

We explored temporal trends of young-of-year (YOY) fishes caught in bottom trawl hauls at an established offshore monitoring site in Lake Erie in fall during 1961–2001. Sampling was conducted during morning, afternoon, and night in each year. Catches per hour (CPH) of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) YOY were relatively low and exhibited no temporal trend. This result was consistent with the species’ intolerance to Lake Erie’s adverse winter water temperatures. Gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) YOY decreased sharply after 1991, which was consistent with recent oligotrophication of the lake. Following the establishment in 1979 and rapid increase of white perch (Morone americana) YOY, white bass (Morone chrysops) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) YOY decreased. Trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) YOY decreased during 1986–1991, but recovered to previous levels during 1991–2001. The recovery coincided with the resurgence of mayflies (Ephemoptera) in the lake. CPH of spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius) and emerald shiner (N. atherinoides) YOY exhibited no temporal trend between 1961 and the late 1970s to early 1980s. CPH of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) YOY decreased during 1961–1988, and walleye (Sander vitreum) YOY increased overall during the time series. These observations were consistent with published studies of adults in the region. CPH of 4 of the 10 species of YOY considered were greatest during night. CPH for walleye YOY was higher in the morning than in the afternoon, but there was no significant difference between night and morning abundances. The results suggest that (1) CPH of YOY fishes may be a useful monitoring tool for Lake Erie, and (2) offshore monitoring programs that do not include night sampling periods may underestimate recruitment for several common species.

Keywords

Lake Erie Monitoring Fishes Offshore Young-of-year Diel sampling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin A. Stapanian
    • 1
    Email author
  • Michael T. Bur
    • 1
  • Jean V. Adams
    • 2
  1. 1.US Geological SurveyGreat Lakes Science CenterSanduskyUSA
  2. 2.US Geological SurveyGreat Lakes Science CenterAnn Arbor, MIUSA

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