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The Monitoring of Insects to Maintain Biodiversity in Ogawa Fores Reserve

  • S. Makino
  • H. Goto
  • T. Inoue
  • M. Sueyoshi
  • K. Okabe
  • M. Hasegawa
  • K. Hamaguchi
  • H. Ctanaka
  • I. Okochi
Article

Abstract

The results of a biodiversity monitoring program conducted in the Ogawa Forest Reserve and its vicinity, situated in a cool temperate region of Japan, identified three different patterns for species richness. Forests of the region are characterized by a mosaic of secondary deciduous stands of various ages scattered among plantations of conifers. The three different types of change in species richness observed in response to the stand age are as follows:
  • Type I (butterflies, tube-renting bees and wasps, hoverflies, fruit flies, and longicorn beetles), the species diversity was highest in open areas, just after clear-cutting, decreasing with the stand age;

  • Type II (mushrooms and mites associated with them), older stands showed greater diversity than younger stands; and,

  • Type III (moths, oribatid mites, collembolas, carabid beetles, and ants), the number of species did not change greatly with the stand age, though ordination analysis revealed that there was variation in species compositions. These results indicate that combinations of stands of different ages, or heterogeneously arranged stands, can contribute to the maintenance of insect biodiversity at the landscape level.

Keywords

chronosequence insects Japan landscape mites secondary deciduous forests soil organisms species richness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Makino
    • 1
  • H. Goto
    • 2
  • T. Inoue
    • 1
  • M. Sueyoshi
    • 3
  • K. Okabe
    • 1
  • M. Hasegawa
    • 4
  • K. Hamaguchi
    • 1
  • H. Ctanaka
    • 1
  • I. Okochi
    • 1
  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research InstituteTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Kyushu Research CenterForestry and Forest Products Research InstituteKumamotoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Systematic Biology, Entomology Section, PO Box 37012National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian InstitutionWashingtonUSA
  4. 4.Kiso Experimental StationForestry and Forest Products Research InstituteNaganoJapan

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