Electronic Commerce Research

, Volume 7, Issue 3–4, pp 367–379 | Cite as

Factors influencing impulse buying during an online purchase

Article

Abstract

Using actual purchasing behavior by visitors to a High School Reunion web store, this study examines the factors that lead to an increased willingness by on-line consumers to purchase impulse items. Consistent with mental accounting and the psychophysics of prices, we find that people’s purchase of the impulse item increases with the total amount spent on other items. We also find that linking a US $1 donation to the impulse item, thereby providing a reason to purchase, increases the frequency of the impulse purchase.

Keywords

Impulse buying E-commerce Reason based choice Mental accounting 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Management SciencesUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada
  2. 2.E-XYN Web SolutionsGuelphCanada

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