European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 133, Issue 3, pp 707–714

New sources of resistance to Fusarium wilt and sterility mosaic disease in a mini-core collection of pigeonpea germplasm

  • Mamta Sharma
  • Abhishek Rathore
  • U. Naga Mangala
  • Raju Ghosh
  • Shivali Sharma
  • HD Upadhyay
  • Suresh Pande
Article

Abstract

Fusarium wilt (FW) and Sterility mosaic disease (SMD) are important biotic constraints to pigeonpea production worldwide. Host plant resistance is the most durable and economical way to manage these diseases. A pigeonpea mini-core collection consisting of 146 germplasm accessions developed from a core collection of 1290 accessions from 53 countries was evaluated to identify sources of resistance to FW and SMD under artificial field epiphytotic conditions during 2007–08 and 2008–09 crop seasons. Resistant sources identified in the field were confirmed in the greenhouse using a root dip screening technique for FW and a leaf stapling technique for SMD. Six accessions (originated from India and Italy were found resistant to FW (<10% mean disease incidence). High level of resistance to SMD was found in 24 accessions (mean incidence <10%). These SMD resistant accessions originated from India, Italy, Kenya, Nepal, Nigeria, Philippines and United Kingdom. Combined resistance to FW and SMD was found in five accessions (ICPs 6739, 8860, 11015, 13304 and 14819). These diverse accessions that are resistant to FW or SMD will be useful to the pigeonpea resistance breeding program.

Keywords

Host plant resistance Mini-core Pigeonpea Fusarium wilt and Sterility mosaic disease 

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Copyright information

© KNPV 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mamta Sharma
    • 1
  • Abhishek Rathore
    • 1
  • U. Naga Mangala
    • 1
  • Raju Ghosh
    • 1
  • Shivali Sharma
    • 1
  • HD Upadhyay
    • 1
  • Suresh Pande
    • 1
  1. 1.International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)AndhraIndia

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