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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 128, Issue 2, pp 165–170 | Cite as

Development of a multiplex RT-PCR detection and identification system for Potato spindle tuber viroid and Tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid

  • Yosuke Matsushita
  • Tomio Usugi
  • Shinya TsudaEmail author
Article

Abstract

Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and Tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid (TCDVd) are two closely related Pospiviroids which cause economically important diseases on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Until now, however, there have been no molecular diagnostic methods available for discriminating between them except sequencing. We have developed a multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) system that simultaneously detects and discriminates between both viroids in one reaction. Using this system, amplified cDNAs resulted in a 271 bp PCR product when PSTVd is detected as the template and 191 bp when TCDVd is detected. This multiplex RT-PCR system was used to accurately detect both viroids in field cultivated tomato and petunia (Petunia × hybrida) plants. This is the first finding of PSTVd in field grown tomatoes in Japan.

Keywords

Multiplex PCR Diagnosis Tomato Potato Petunia PSTVd TCDVd 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The mild isolate of PSTVd were kindly supplied by the Yokohama Plant Protection Station, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan. We are grateful to T. Sano and S. Matsuura for their helpful comments. We thank Y. Matsumura and S. Nagai for the preparation of and the maintenance of the plants, and L.M. Knight for critically reading of this manuscript. This study was supported, in part, by a Grant-in-Aid from the Research Project for Utilizing Advanced Technologies in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, administered by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan.

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Copyright information

© KNPV 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute of Floricultural ScienceTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.National Agricultural Research CenterTsukubaJapan

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