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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 121, Issue 2, pp 195–199 | Cite as

Fusarium mangiferae associated with mango malformation in the Sultanate of Oman

  • M. Kvas
  • E. T. Steenkamp
  • A. O. Al Adawi
  • M. L. Deadman
  • A. A. Al Jahwari
  • W. F. O. Marasas
  • B. D. Wingfield
  • R. C. Ploetz
  • M. J. Wingfield
Short Communication

Abstract

Mango malformation, caused by Fusarium mangiferae, represents the most important floral disease of mango. The first symptoms of this disease were noticed in the beginning of 2005 in plantations at Sohar in the Sultanate of Oman. The affected inflorescences were abnormally enlarged and branched with heavy and dried-out panicles. Based on morphology and DNA-sequence data for the genes encoding translation elongation factor 1α and β-tubulin, the pathogen associated with these symptoms was identified as F. mangiferae.

Keywords

Gibberella fujikuroi complex Translation elongation factor 1α β-tubulin 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank National Research Foundation (NRF), members of Tree Protection Co-operative Programme (TPCP), Centre for Tree Health Biotechnology (CTHB), University of Pretoria in South Africa and Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries in the Sultanate of Oman for financial support.

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Copyright information

© KNPV 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Kvas
    • 1
  • E. T. Steenkamp
    • 1
  • A. O. Al Adawi
    • 2
  • M. L. Deadman
    • 3
  • A. A. Al Jahwari
    • 2
  • W. F. O. Marasas
    • 1
  • B. D. Wingfield
    • 4
  • R. C. Ploetz
    • 5
  • M. J. Wingfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI)University of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.Ghadafan Agriculture Research StationMinistry of Agriculture and FisheriesSoharSultanate of Oman
  3. 3.Department of Crop Sciences, College of Agricultural and Marine SciencesSultan Qaboos UniversityAl KhodSultanate of Oman
  4. 4.Department of Genetics, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology institute (FABI)University of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  5. 5.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of FloridaHomesteadUSA

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