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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 112, Issue 2, pp 143–154 | Cite as

Predominance and association of pathogenic fungi causing Fusarium ear blightin wheat in four European countries

  • X. -M. Xu
  • D. W. Parry
  • P. Nicholson
  • M. A. Thomsett
  • D. Simpson
  • S. G. Edwards
  • B. M. Cooke
  • F. M. Doohan
  • J. M. Brennan
  • A.  Moretti
  • G. Tocco
  • G. Mule
  • L. Hornok
  • G. Giczey
  • J. Tatnell
Article

Abstract

Two years of field sampling aimed to establish the predominance and association among the fungal pathogens causing Fusarium ear blight (FEB) in four European countries (Hungary, Ireland, Italy and the UK). A PCR-based method was used to detect four Fusarium species and two varieties of Microdochium nivale present in the samples. The prevalence of FEB pathogens differed significantly between countries. Overall, all pathogens were commonly detected in Ireland and to a lesser extent in the UK. In contrast, only two species, F. graminearum and F. poae, were regularly detected in Italy and Hungary. Fusarium culmorum was rarely detected except in Ireland. Log-linear models were used to determine whether there is the independence of the six FEB pathogens at each sampling site. Significant two-pathogen interactions were frequently observed, particularly in harvest samples; all these significant two-pathogen interactions were of the synergistic type, except between F. poae and F. culmorum, and were generally consistent over the 2 years and four countries. Fusarium graminearum and F. poae were least frequently involved in two pathogen interactions but were involved in most of the nine significant three-pathogen interactions. However, only the interaction between F. graminearum, F. avenaceum and F. poae was significant in both years. Potential implications of the present results in FEB management are discussed.

Keywords

competition interaction synergy 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • X. -M. Xu
    • 1
  • D. W. Parry
    • 1
  • P. Nicholson
    • 2
  • M. A. Thomsett
    • 2
  • D. Simpson
    • 2
  • S. G. Edwards
    • 3
  • B. M. Cooke
    • 4
  • F. M. Doohan
    • 4
  • J. M. Brennan
    • 4
  • A.  Moretti
    • 5
  • G. Tocco
    • 5
  • G. Mule
    • 5
  • L. Hornok
    • 6
  • G. Giczey
    • 6
  • J. Tatnell
    • 7
  1. 1.East Malling ResearchEast MallingUK;
  2. 2.Cereals Research DepartmentJohn Innes Centre, Norwich Research ParkColneyUK
  3. 3.Crop and Environment Research CentreHarper Adams University CollegeNewportUK
  4. 4.Department of Environmental Resource ManagementUniversity College DublinBelfieldIreland
  5. 5.Institute of Sciences of Food ProductionResearch National CouncilItaly
  6. 6.Agricultural Biotechnology CenterSzent-Györgyi 4Hungary
  7. 7.SyngentaWhittlesfordUK

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