European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 112, Issue 3, pp 289–292 | Cite as

Brassica napus plants infected by Leptosphaeria maculans after the third to fifth leaf growth stage in south-eastern Australia do not develop blackleg stem canker

  • S.J. Marcroft
  • M.R. Sosnowski
  • E.S. Scott
  • M.D. Ramsey
  • P.A. Salisbury
  • B.J. Howlett
Short communication

Abstract

Blackleg (Phoma stem canker) caused by Leptosphaeria maculans is the most damaging disease of Brassica napus (canola, rapeseed, colza) worldwide and is controlled by sowing blackleg resistant cultivars and crop management strategies that reduce exposure to inoculum and fungicide application. In experiments in south-eastern Australia, canola cultivars inoculated after the three to five leaf growth stage did not develop stem canker. Although mature canola plants are known to be less susceptible to blackleg than seedlings, this highlights for the first time the specific importance of protecting seedlings up to the three to five leaf growth stage in Australia. This would typically correspond to a period of four to six weeks after emergence. Canola plants are likely to be significantly less vulnerable to infection after this growth stage. However, this timing may vary due to the influence of environmental conditions.

Keywords

canola oilseed rape Phoma lingam Phoma stem canker 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S.J. Marcroft
    • 1
    • 2
  • M.R. Sosnowski
    • 3
    • 4
  • E.S. Scott
    • 3
  • M.D. Ramsey
    • 4
    • 5
  • P.A. Salisbury
    • 1
    • 6
  • B.J. Howlett
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Primary IndustriesHorshamAustralia
  2. 2.Grains Innovation ParkHorsham Australia
  3. 3.Discipline of Plant and Pest ScienceThe University of AdelaideGlen OsmondAustralia
  4. 4.South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI)Australia
  5. 5.Animal and Plant Control CommissionAustralia
  6. 6.Institute of Land and Food ResourcesThe University of MelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.School of BotanyThe University of MelbourneAustralia

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