European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 209–217

Association of coffee consumption and CYP1A2 polymorphism with risk of impaired fasting glucose in hypertensive patients

  • Paolo Palatini
  • Elisabetta Benetti
  • Lucio Mos
  • Guido Garavelli
  • Adriano Mazzer
  • Susanna Cozzio
  • Claudio Fania
  • Edoardo Casiglia
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

DOI: 10.1007/s10654-015-9990-z

Cite this article as:
Palatini, P., Benetti, E., Mos, L. et al. Eur J Epidemiol (2015) 30: 209. doi:10.1007/s10654-015-9990-z

Abstract

Whether and how coffee use influences glucose metabolism is still a matter for debate. We investigated whether baseline coffee consumption is longitudinally associated with risk of impaired fasting glucose in a cohort of 18-to-45 year old subjects screened for stage 1 hypertension and whether CYP1A2 polymorphism modulates this association. A total of 1,180 nondiabetic patients attending 17 hospital centers were included. Seventy-four percent of our subjects drank coffee. Among the coffee drinkers, 87 % drank 1–3 cups/day (moderate drinkers), and 13 % drank over 3 cups/day (heavy drinkers). Genotyping of CYP1A2 SNP was performed by real time PCR in 639 subjects. At the end of a median follow-up of 6.1 years, impaired fasting glucose was found in 24.0 % of the subjects. In a multivariable Cox regression coffee use was a predictor of impaired fasting glucose at study end, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.3 (95 % CI 0.97–1.8) in moderate coffee drinkers and of 2.3 (1.5–3.5) in heavy drinkers compared to abstainers. Among the subjects stratified by CYP1A2 genotype, heavy coffee drinkers carriers of the slow *1F allele (59 %) had a higher adjusted risk of impaired fasting glucose (HR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.3–5.9) compared to abstainers whereas this association was of borderline statistical significance among the homozygous for the A allele (HR 1.7, 95 % CI 0.8–3.8). These data show that coffee consumption increases the risk of impaired fasting glucose in hypertension particularly among carriers of the slow CYP1A2 *1F allele.

Keywords

Coffee Caffeine Hypertension Prediabetes CYP1A2 Genes 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Palatini
    • 1
  • Elisabetta Benetti
    • 1
  • Lucio Mos
    • 2
  • Guido Garavelli
    • 3
  • Adriano Mazzer
    • 4
  • Susanna Cozzio
    • 5
  • Claudio Fania
    • 1
  • Edoardo Casiglia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Vascular MedicineUniversity of PadovaPaduaItaly
  2. 2.Town HospitalSan Daniele del FriuliItaly
  3. 3.Town HospitalCremonaItaly
  4. 4.Town HospitalVittorio VenetoItaly
  5. 5.Town HospitalTrentoItaly

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