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European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 35–48 | Cite as

Adult height and head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis within the INHANCE Consortium

  • Emanuele Leoncini
  • Walter Ricciardi
  • Gabriella Cadoni
  • Dario Arzani
  • Livia Petrelli
  • Gaetano Paludetti
  • Paul Brennan
  • Daniele Luce
  • Isabelle Stucker
  • Keitaro Matsuo
  • Renato Talamini
  • Carlo La Vecchia
  • Andrew F. Olshan
  • Deborah M. Winn
  • Rolando Herrero
  • Silvia Franceschi
  • Xavier Castellsague
  • Joshua Muscat
  • Hal Morgenstern
  • Zuo-Feng Zhang
  • Fabio Levi
  • Luigino Dal Maso
  • Karl Kelsey
  • Michael McClean
  • Thomas L. Vaughan
  • Philip Lazarus
  • Mark P. Purdue
  • Richard B. Hayes
  • Chu Chen
  • Stephen M. Schwartz
  • Oxana Shangina
  • Sergio Koifman
  • Wolfgang Ahrens
  • Elena Matos
  • Pagona Lagiou
  • Jolanta Lissowska
  • Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska
  • Leticia Fernandez
  • Ana Menezes
  • Antonio Agudo
  • Alexander W. Daudt
  • Lorenzo Richiardi
  • Kristina Kjaerheim
  • Dana Mates
  • Jaroslav Betka
  • Guo-Pei Yu
  • Stimson Schantz
  • Lorenzo Simonato
  • Hermann Brenner
  • David I. Conway
  • Tatiana V. Macfarlane
  • Peter Thomson
  • Eleonora Fabianova
  • Ariana Znaor
  • Peter Rudnai
  • Claire Healy
  • Paolo Boffetta
  • Shu-Chun Chuang
  • Yuan-Chin Amy Lee
  • Mia Hashibe
  • Stefania Boccia
CANCER

Abstract

Several epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between adult height and cancer incidence. The only study conducted among women on mouth and pharynx cancer risk, however, reported an inverse association. This study aims to investigate the association between height and the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) within a large international consortium of HNC. We analyzed pooled individual-level data from 24 case–control studies participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated separately for men and women for associations between height and HNC risk. Educational level, tobacco smoking, and alcohol consumption were included in all regression models. Stratified analyses by HNC subsites were performed. This project included 17,666 cases and 28,198 controls. We found an inverse association between height and HNC (adjusted OR per 10 cm height = 0.91, 95 % CI 0.86–0.95 for men; adjusted OR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.79–0.93 for women). In men, the estimated OR did vary by educational level, smoking status, geographic area, and control source. No differences by subsites were detected. Adult height is inversely associated with HNC risk. As height can be considered a marker of childhood illness and low energy intake, the inverse association is consistent with prior studies showing that HNC occur more frequently among deprived individuals. Further studies designed to elucidate the mechanism of such association would be warranted.

Keywords

Cancer Height Consortium Head and neck neoplasms 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank all of the participants who took part in this research for providing us very insightful and constructive comments, which helped improve this manuscript. The individual studies were supported by the following grants: Central Europe study: World Cancer Research Fund and the European Commission INCO-COPERNICUS Program (IC15- CT98-0332). France study (2001–2007): French National Research Agency (ANR); French National Cancer Institute (INCA); French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (ANSES); French Association for Research on Cancer (ARC); Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale (FRM); French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (InVS); Fondation de France; Ministry of Labour; Ministry of Health. Saarland study: Ministry of Science, Research and Arts Baden-Wurttemberg. Aviano study: Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC), Italian League Against Cancer and Italian Ministry of Research. Milan study (1984–1989): Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC). Milan study (2006–2009): Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC, grant n. 10068) and Italian Ministry of Education (PRIN 2009 X8YCBN). Italy Multicenter study: Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC), Italian League Against Cancer and Italian Ministry of Research. Rome study (2010–2013): AIRC (Italian Agency for Research on Cancer), n. 10491. Swiss study: Swiss League against Cancer and the Swiss Research against Cancer/Oncosuisse (KFS-700, OCS-1633). Western Europe study: European Community (5th Framework Programme) (QLK1-CT-2001-00182). Boston study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (R01CA078609, R01CA100679). Los Angeles study: National Institute of Health (NIH) US (P50CA090388, R01DA011386, R03CA077954, T32CA009142, U01CA096134, R21ES011667) and the Alper Research Program for Environmental Genomics of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. MSKCC study: NIH (R01CA051845). New York Multicenter study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (P01CA068384 K07CA104231). North Carolina (1994–1997): National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (R01CA061188), and in part by a grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (P30ES010126). Seattle-LEO study: NIH (R01CA030022). Seattle study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (R01CA048996, R01DE012609). Tampa study: National Institutes of Health (NIH) US (P01CA068384, K07CA104231, R01DE013158). US Multicenter study: The Intramural Program of the NCI, NIH, United States. Puerto Rico study: jointly funded by National Institutes of Health (NCI) US and NIDCR intramural programs. Latin America study: Fondo para la Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (FONCYT) Argentina, IMIM (Barcelona), Fundaco de Amparo a' Pesquisa no Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP) (No 01/01768-2), and European Commission (IC18-CT97-0222). Japan (1988–2000 and 2001–2005): Scientific Research grant from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, Culture and Technology of Japan (17015052) and grant for the Third-Term Comprehensive 10-Year Strategy for Cancer Control from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan (H20-002). IARC Multicenter study: Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias (FIS) of the Spanish Government (FIS 97/0024, FIS 97/0662, BAE 01/5013), International Union Against Cancer (UICC), and Yamagiwa-Yoshida Memorial International Cancer Study Grant. The work of EL was supported by Fondazione Veronesi.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emanuele Leoncini
    • 1
  • Walter Ricciardi
    • 1
  • Gabriella Cadoni
    • 2
  • Dario Arzani
    • 1
  • Livia Petrelli
    • 2
  • Gaetano Paludetti
    • 2
  • Paul Brennan
    • 3
  • Daniele Luce
    • 4
  • Isabelle Stucker
    • 4
  • Keitaro Matsuo
    • 5
  • Renato Talamini
    • 6
  • Carlo La Vecchia
    • 7
    • 8
  • Andrew F. Olshan
    • 9
  • Deborah M. Winn
    • 10
  • Rolando Herrero
    • 3
  • Silvia Franceschi
    • 3
  • Xavier Castellsague
    • 11
  • Joshua Muscat
    • 12
  • Hal Morgenstern
    • 13
  • Zuo-Feng Zhang
    • 14
  • Fabio Levi
    • 15
  • Luigino Dal Maso
    • 6
  • Karl Kelsey
    • 16
  • Michael McClean
    • 17
  • Thomas L. Vaughan
    • 18
  • Philip Lazarus
    • 12
  • Mark P. Purdue
    • 10
  • Richard B. Hayes
    • 19
  • Chu Chen
    • 18
  • Stephen M. Schwartz
    • 18
  • Oxana Shangina
    • 20
  • Sergio Koifman
    • 21
  • Wolfgang Ahrens
    • 22
    • 51
  • Elena Matos
    • 23
  • Pagona Lagiou
    • 24
  • Jolanta Lissowska
    • 25
  • Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska
    • 26
  • Leticia Fernandez
    • 27
  • Ana Menezes
    • 28
  • Antonio Agudo
    • 29
  • Alexander W. Daudt
    • 30
  • Lorenzo Richiardi
    • 31
  • Kristina Kjaerheim
    • 32
  • Dana Mates
    • 33
  • Jaroslav Betka
    • 34
    • 35
  • Guo-Pei Yu
    • 36
  • Stimson Schantz
    • 36
  • Lorenzo Simonato
    • 37
  • Hermann Brenner
    • 38
  • David I. Conway
    • 39
  • Tatiana V. Macfarlane
    • 40
  • Peter Thomson
    • 41
  • Eleonora Fabianova
    • 42
  • Ariana Znaor
    • 43
  • Peter Rudnai
    • 44
  • Claire Healy
    • 45
  • Paolo Boffetta
    • 46
    • 47
  • Shu-Chun Chuang
    • 48
  • Yuan-Chin Amy Lee
    • 49
  • Mia Hashibe
    • 49
  • Stefania Boccia
    • 1
    • 50
  1. 1.Section of Hygiene, Institute of Public HealthUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRomeItaly
  2. 2.Institute of OtorhinolaryngologyUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRomeItaly
  3. 3.International Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  4. 4.INSERM UMRS 1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population HealthVillejuifFrance
  5. 5.Aichi Cancer Center Research InstituteNagoyaJapan
  6. 6.Centro di Riferimento Oncologico IRCCSAvianoItaly
  7. 7.IRCCS Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario NegriMilanItaly
  8. 8.University of MilanMilanItaly
  9. 9.University of North Carolina, Gillings School of Global Public HealthChapel HillUSA
  10. 10.National Cancer Institute, National Institute of HealthBethesdaUSA
  11. 11.Institut Catala d’Oncologia (ICO), IDIBELL, CIBER-ESPBarcelonaSpain
  12. 12.Penn State College of MedicineHersheyUSA
  13. 13.Departments of Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  14. 14.Department of EpidemiologyUCLA Fielding School of Public Health and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer CenterLos AngelesUSA
  15. 15.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (IUMSP)Lausanne University HospitalLausanneSwitzerland
  16. 16.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  17. 17.Boston University School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  18. 18.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  19. 19.Division of EpidemiologyNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  20. 20.Cancer Research CentreMoscowRussia
  21. 21.Escola Nacional de Saude PublicaFundacao Oswaldo CruzRio de JaneiroBrazil
  22. 22.Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPSBremenGermany
  23. 23.Institute of Oncology Angel H. RoffoUniversity of Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina
  24. 24.University of Athens School of MedicineAthensGreece
  25. 25.Department of Cancer Epidemiology and PreventionM. Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of OncologyWarsawPoland
  26. 26.Institute of Occupational MedicineLodzPoland
  27. 27.Institute of Oncology and RadiobiologyHavanaCuba
  28. 28.Universidade Federal de PelotasPelotasBrazil
  29. 29.Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), IDIBELLBarcelonaSpain
  30. 30.Hospital de Clinicas de Porto AlegrePorto AlegreBrazil
  31. 31.Department of Medical SciencesUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  32. 32.Cancer Registry of NorwayOsloNorway
  33. 33.National Institute of Public HealthBucharestRomania
  34. 34.Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, First Faculty of MedicineCharles University in PraguePragueCzech Republic
  35. 35.University Hospital MotolPragueCzech Republic
  36. 36.New York Eye and Ear InfirmaryNew YorkUSA
  37. 37.University of PaduaPaduaItaly
  38. 38.Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging ResearchGerman Cancer Research CenterHeidelbergGermany
  39. 39.Dental School, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life SciencesUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK
  40. 40.University of Aberdeen Dental SchoolAberdeenUK
  41. 41.School of Dental SciencesNewcastle UniversityNewcastleUK
  42. 42.Regional Authority of Public HealthBanska BystricaSlovakia
  43. 43.Croatian National Cancer RegistryZagrebCroatia
  44. 44.National Institute of Environmental HealthBudapestHungary
  45. 45.Trinity College School of Dental ScienceDublinIreland
  46. 46.The Tisch Cancer InstituteMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  47. 47.International Prevention Research InstituteLyonFrance
  48. 48.Imperial College LondonLondonUK
  49. 49.Department of Family and Preventive MedicineUniversity of Utah School of MedicineSalt Lake CityUSA
  50. 50.IRCCS San Raffaele PisanaRomeItaly
  51. 51.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceUniversity of BremenBremenGermany

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