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European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 329–334 | Cite as

Normal spirometry values in healthy elderly: the Rotterdam Study

  • Daan Willem Loth
  • Till Ittermann
  • Lies Lahousse
  • Albert Hofman
  • Hubert Gerardus Maria Leufkens
  • Guy Gaston Brusselle
  • Bruno Hugo StrickerEmail author
RESPIRATORY EPIDEMIOLOGY

Abstract

Although many different reference values for spirometry are available from various studies, the elderly are usually underrepresented. Therefore, our objective was to assess reference values in a sample of healthy participants from a prospective population-based cohort study, including a large proportion of elderly. We included spirometry measurements of healthy, never smokers, from the Rotterdam Study and excluded participants with respiratory symptoms or prescriptions for respiratory medication. Age- and height-specific curves for the 5th (lower limit of normal) and the 50th (median) percentile of Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 s (FEV1), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), and the ratio (FEV1/FVC) were calculated by quantile regression models. The group of healthy elderly study subjects consisted of 1,125 individuals, with a mean age of 68 years, ranging from 47 to 96 years of age. Sex stratified equations for the median and the lower limit of normal were calculated adjusted for age and height. In this study, we report age- and height-dependent reference limits for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC in a large population, and prediction equations for the lower limit of normal and median values for a sample containing a large proportion of healthy elderly.

Keywords

FEV1 FVC FEV1/FVC Spirometry Elderly Reference equations Population studies 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Study Design: A.H. Data collection: A.H., D.L, L.L., G.G.B and B.H.S. Data-analysis and writing: D.W.L, T.I., B.H.S and G.G.B. Critical Review: G.G.B., T.I., L.L, A.H., H.G.M.L. and B.H.S. D.W.L and B.H.S. take responsibility for the integrity of this work. The Rotterdam Study is funded by Erasmus Medical Center and Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands Organization for the Health Research and Development (ZonMw), the Research Institute for Diseases in the Elderly (RIDE), the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, the Ministry for Health, Welfare and Sports, the European Commission (DG XII) and the Municipality of Rotterdam. The authors are grateful to the study participants, the staff from the Rotterdam Study and the participating general practitioners. Lies Lahousse is the recipient of a European Respiratory Society Fellowship (STRTF fellowship n° 131-2011).

Conflict of interest

None of the authors had any conflicts of interest to declare with respect to this paper.

Supplementary material

10654_2013_9800_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (45 kb)
This figure shows the result of the equations for FEV1 from our study compared to those from the study by Hankinson and the ECCS/ERS equations. These graphs show the values for the age range of 60 to 90 years and heights of 160, 170, 180 and 190 cm for males. For Hankinson’s and our equation, we present both the predicted values and the lower limit or normal (PDF 45 kb)
10654_2013_9800_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (45 kb)
This figure shows the result of the equations for FEV1 from our study compared to those from the study by Hankinson and the ECCS/ERS equations. These graphs show the values for the age range of 60 to 90 years and heights of 150, 160, 170 and 180 cm for females. For Hankinson’s and our equation, we present both the predicted values and the lower limit or normal (PDF 44 kb)
10654_2013_9800_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (44 kb)
This figure shows the result of the equations for FVC from our study compared to those from the study by Hankinson and the ECCS/ERS equations. These graphs show the values for the age range of 60 to 90 years and heights of 160, 170, 180 and 190 cm for males. For Hankinson’s and our equation, we present both the predicted values and the lower limit or normal (PDF 44 kb)
10654_2013_9800_MOESM4_ESM.pdf (45 kb)
This figure shows the result of the equations for FVC from our study compared to those from the study by Hankinson and the ECCS/ERS equations. These graphs show the values for the age range of 60 to 90 years and heights of 150, 160, 170 and 180 cm for females. For Hankinson’s and our equation, we present both the predicted values and the lower limit or normal (PDF 44 kb)
10654_2013_9800_MOESM5_ESM.pdf (32 kb)
This figure shows the result of the equations for FEV1/FVC from our study compared to those from the study by Hankinson and the ECCS/ERS equations. These graphs show the values for the age range of 60 to 90 years and heights of 175 cm for males and 165 cm females. For Hankinson’s and our equation, we present both the predicted values and the lower limit or normal (PDF 31 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daan Willem Loth
    • 1
    • 2
  • Till Ittermann
    • 3
  • Lies Lahousse
    • 1
    • 4
  • Albert Hofman
    • 1
  • Hubert Gerardus Maria Leufkens
    • 5
  • Guy Gaston Brusselle
    • 4
  • Bruno Hugo Stricker
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyErasmus Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Inspectorate of Health CareThe HagueThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Institute for Community MedicineUniversity of GreifswaldGreifswaldGermany
  4. 4.Department of Respiratory MedicineGhent University HospitalGhentBelgium
  5. 5.Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacotherapy, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical SciencesUtrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands
  6. 6.Department of Medical InformaticsErasmus Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands
  7. 7.Department of Internal MedicineErasmus Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands

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