EPIC-Heart: The cardiovascular component of a prospective study of nutritional, lifestyle and biological factors in 520,000 middle-aged participants from 10 European countries

  • John Danesh
  • Rodolfo Saracci
  • Göran Berglund
  • Edith Feskens
  • Kim Overvad
  • Salvatore Panico
  • Simon Thompson
  • Agnès Fournier
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
  • Marianne Canonico
  • Rudolf Kaaks
  • Jakob Linseisen
  • Heiner Boeing
  • Tobias Pischon
  • Cornelia Weikert
  • Anja Olsen
  • Anne Tjønneland
  • Søren Paaske Johnsen
  • Majken Karoline Jensen
  • Jose R. Quirós
  • Carlos Alberto Gonzalez Svatetz
  • Maria-José Sánchez Pérez
  • Nerea Larrañaga
  • Carmen Navarro Sanchez
  • Concepción Moreno Iribas
  • Sheila Bingham
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
  • Nick Wareham
  • Timothy Key
  • Andrew Roddam
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
  • Vassiliki Benetou
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
  • Giovanna Masala
  • Sabina Sieri
  • Rosario Tumino
  • Carlotta Sacerdote
  • Amalia Mattiello
  • W. M. Monique Verschuren
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
  • Diederick E. Grobbee
  • Yvonne T. van der Schouw
  • Olle Melander
  • Göran Hallmans
  • Patrik Wennberg
  • Eiliv Lund
  • Merethe Kumle
  • Guri Skeie
  • Pietro Ferrari
  • Nadia Slimani
  • Teresa Norat
  • Elio Riboli
New Study

Abstract

EPIC-Heart is the cardiovascular component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a multi-centre prospective cohort study investigating the relationship between nutrition and major chronic disease outcomes. Its objective is to advance understanding about the separate and combined influences of lifestyle (especially dietary), environmental, metabolic and genetic factors in the development of cardiovascular diseases by making best possible use of the unusually informative database and biological samples in EPIC. Between 1992 and 2000, 519,978 participants (366,521 women and 153,457 men, mostly aged 35–70 years) in 23 centres in 10 European countries commenced follow-up for cause-specific mortality, cancer incidence and major cardiovascular morbidity. Dietary information was collected with quantitative questionnaires or semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, including a 24-h dietary recall sub-study to help calibrate the dietary measurements. Information was collected on physical activity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, occupational history, socio-economic status, and history of previous illnesses. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure recordings were made in the majority of participants. Blood samples were taken from 385,747 individuals, from which plasma, serum, red cells, and buffy coat fractions were separated and aliquoted for long-term storage. By 2004, an estimated 10,000 incident fatal and non-fatal coronary and stroke events had been recorded. The first cycle of EPIC-Heart analyses will assess associations of coronary mortality with several prominent dietary hypotheses and with established cardiovascular risk factors. Subsequent analyses will extend this approach to non-fatal cardiovascular outcomes␣and to further dietary, biochemical and genetic factors.

Keywords

Diet EPIC Heart Prospective study Study protocol 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The following individuals have also contributed to EPIC-Heart: Aurelio Barricarte, Franco Berrino, J.␣Beulens, Paolo Boffetta, Hendriek Boshuizen, Michiel Bots, M.D. Chirlaque, Miren Dorronsoro, Bo Hedblad, Emmanuelle Kesse, Kerstin Klipstein-Grobusch, Jonas Manjer, Carmen Martinez, Domenico Palli, Petra Peeters, Fernando Rodriguez Artalejo, Joan Sabaté, Manj Sandhu, Nadeem Sarwar, M.J.␣Tormo, Ruth Travis, Hans Verhagen and Paolo Vineis.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Danesh
    • 1
  • Rodolfo Saracci
    • 2
  • Göran Berglund
    • 3
  • Edith Feskens
    • 4
  • Kim Overvad
    • 5
  • Salvatore Panico
    • 6
  • Simon Thompson
    • 7
  • Agnès Fournier
    • 8
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
    • 8
  • Marianne Canonico
    • 9
  • Rudolf Kaaks
    • 10
  • Jakob Linseisen
    • 10
  • Heiner Boeing
    • 11
  • Tobias Pischon
    • 11
  • Cornelia Weikert
    • 11
  • Anja Olsen
    • 12
  • Anne Tjønneland
    • 12
  • Søren Paaske Johnsen
    • 5
  • Majken Karoline Jensen
    • 5
  • Jose R. Quirós
    • 13
  • Carlos Alberto Gonzalez Svatetz
    • 14
  • Maria-José Sánchez Pérez
    • 15
  • Nerea Larrañaga
    • 16
  • Carmen Navarro Sanchez
    • 17
  • Concepción Moreno Iribas
    • 18
  • Sheila Bingham
    • 19
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
    • 20
  • Nick Wareham
    • 21
  • Timothy Key
    • 22
  • Andrew Roddam
    • 22
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
    • 23
  • Vassiliki Benetou
    • 23
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
    • 23
  • Giovanna Masala
    • 24
  • Sabina Sieri
    • 25
  • Rosario Tumino
    • 26
  • Carlotta Sacerdote
    • 27
  • Amalia Mattiello
    • 6
  • W. M. Monique Verschuren
    • 28
  • H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
    • 29
  • Diederick E. Grobbee
    • 30
  • Yvonne T. van der Schouw
    • 30
  • Olle Melander
    • 3
  • Göran Hallmans
    • 31
  • Patrik Wennberg
    • 32
  • Eiliv Lund
    • 33
  • Merethe Kumle
    • 33
  • Guri Skeie
    • 33
  • Pietro Ferrari
    • 2
  • Nadia Slimani
    • 2
  • Teresa Norat
    • 34
  • Elio Riboli
    • 34
  1. 1.EPIC-Heart Secretariat, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Strangeways Research LaboratoryUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  2. 2.International Agency for Research on Cancer — WHOLyonFrance
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Sciences, MalmöUniversity of LundLundSweden
  4. 4.Division of Human NutritionWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg HospitalAarhus University HospitalAarhusDenmark
  6. 6.Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineFederico II UniversityNaplesItaly
  7. 7.MRC Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public HealthUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  8. 8.Inserm ERI20, Institut Gustave RoussyVillejuifFrance
  9. 9.Inserm U780VillejuifFrance
  10. 10.Division of Clinical EpidemiologyGerman Cancer Research CentreHeidelbergGermany
  11. 11.Department of EpidemiologyGerman Institute of Human NutritionPotsdam-RehbrückeGermany
  12. 12.Institute of Cancer EpidemiologyDanish Cancer SocietyCopenhagenDenmark
  13. 13.Public Health and Planning DirectorateAsturiasSpain
  14. 14.Department of Epidemiology and Cancer RegistryCatalan Institute of OncologyBarcelonaSpain
  15. 15.The Andalusian School of Public HealthGranadaSpain
  16. 16.Public Health Department of GipuzcoaSan SebastianSpain
  17. 17.Department of EpidemiologyMurcia Health CouncilMurciaSpain
  18. 18.Public Health Institute of NavarraPamplonaSpain
  19. 19.MRC Centre for Nutritional Epidemiology in Cancer Prevention and Survival, Department of Public Health and Primary CareUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  20. 20.Clinical Gerontology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary CareUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  21. 21.MRC Epidemiology UnitCambridgeUK
  22. 22.Cancer Research UK Epidemiology UnitUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  23. 23.Department of Hygiene and EpidemiologyUniversity of Athens Medical SchoolAthensGreece
  24. 24.Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, CSPOScientific Institute of TuscanyFlorenceItaly
  25. 25.Nutritional Epidemiology UnitItalian National Cancer InstituteMilanItaly
  26. 26.Cancer RegistryAzienda Ospedaliera “Civile M.P. Arezzo”RagusaItaly
  27. 27.Department of Biomedical Science and Human OncologyCPO-PiemonteTorinoItaly
  28. 28.Centre for Prevention and health Services ResearchNational Institute for Public Health and the EnvironmentBilthovenThe Netherlands
  29. 29.Centre for Nutrition and HealthNational Institute for Public Health and the EnvironmentBilthovenThe Netherlands
  30. 30.Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary careUniversity Medical Centre UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands
  31. 31.Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutrition ResearchUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  32. 32.Department of MedicineSkellefteå HospitalSkellefteåSweden
  33. 33.Institute of Community MedicineUniversity of TromsøTromsøNorway
  34. 34.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthImperial College LondonLondonUK

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