Environmental Geochemistry and Health

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 441–449 | Cite as

Spatial variability and temporal trends of HCH and DDT in soils around Beijing Guanting Reservoir, China

  • Wenyou Hu
  • Yonglong Lu
  • Tieyu Wang
  • Wei Luo
  • Yajuan Shi
  • John P. Giesy
  • Jing Geng
  • Wentao Jiao
  • Guang Wang
  • Chunli Chen
Original Paper

Abstract

Spatial variability and temporal trends in concentrations of the organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), in surface soils around Beijing Guanting Reservoir (GTR) were studied in 2003 and 2007. Concentrations of the two OCPs in soils around GTR were generally less than reference values set by the Chinese government for the protection of agricultural production and human health. Among the OCPs, β-HCH and p, p′-DDE were the two predominant compounds. This result indicates that the HCH and DDT residues in soils were primarily from historical use. Based on kriging, a spatial distribution of HCH and DDT around the GTR was observed. Spatial variability indicated how HCH and DDT had been applied and been distributed in the past. Between 2003 and 2007, concentrations of HCH and DDT decreased more rapidly in orchard soils than those in fallow soils.

Keywords

Land use Watershed Hexachlorocyclohexane and Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane Geo-statistical methods Kriging 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (“973” Research Program) with grant no. 2007CB407307, the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences with grant no. KZCX2-YW-420-5 and no. RCEES-QN-200707, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China with grant no. 40601089. Prof. Giesy was supported by the Canada Research Chair program. The authors are grateful to Professor Kurunthachalam Kannan, Wadsworth Center, Albany, New York, for his constructive comments. We also thank the editors and reviewers for their careful work and comments that improved this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenyou Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yonglong Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tieyu Wang
    • 1
  • Wei Luo
    • 1
  • Yajuan Shi
    • 1
  • John P. Giesy
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jing Geng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wentao Jiao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guang Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chunli Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Graduate School of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences & Toxicology CenterUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  4. 4.Department of Zoology, Center for Integrative ToxicologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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