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Towards an argumentative grammar for networking: a case of coordinating two approaches

Abstract

The networking of theories is an increasingly common and powerful approach to analyzing complex phenomena such as learning processes in classrooms. In this paper, we aim to advance the theoretical coordination of two approaches that we have previously combined to analyze individual, small group, and whole class mathematical progress. The theoretical advances we make are twofold. First, we identify and illuminate environmental and internal-theoretical commonalities across the two approaches, commonalities that contribute to the productivity of networking. Second, we propose an argumentative grammar for the networking, thus elevating the methodological logic and rationale of networking in this case and potentially in general.

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Correspondence to Michal Tabach.

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Tabach, M., Rasmussen, C., Dreyfus, T. et al. Towards an argumentative grammar for networking: a case of coordinating two approaches. Educ Stud Math 103, 139–155 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10649-020-09934-7

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Keywords

  • Networking
  • Internal-theoretical commonalities
  • Argumentative grammar
  • Classroom learning